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Please Note: Venue for SSS1 lectures (Mondays 12-3pm): Boyd Orr Building Room 611.

Page Contents:

·         SSS1 Lectures & Lab Material

o        Lecture 1 Density Functions and the Central Limit Theorem

o        Lecture 2 Calculating and Applying z-scores

o        Lecture 3 Introduction to Confidence Intervals

o        Lecture 4 Confidence Intervals for Various Applications

o        Lecture 5 Introduction to Hypothesis Tests

o        Lecture 6 Hypothesis Tests for Proportions & 2 Populations

o        Lecture 7 Introduction to Regression

o        Revision Lecture I: Sampling Distributions & Confidence Intervals

o        Revision Lecture II: Hypothesis Tests

·         SSS1 Assignment

·         SSS1 Data

·         SSS1 Macros for Home Use

·         SSS1 Macros for Labs

·         SSS1 Material from previous years

·         Additional Slides:

o        If only…

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Lecture 2: Calculating and Applying z-scores

Lecture Structure:

  1. Find probabilities from zi

·         Tables

·         SPSS

2. Find zi from a given probability

·         z that bounds upper or lower tail area

·         ± z that bounds central area

3. Find zi & probabilitiy from xi ~N(μ,s)

4. Applying z scores to sampling distributions

Additional Lecture Notes:  Applying z-scores to non-normal distributions

Lab Exercises associated with lecture 2

 

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Lecture 3: Introduction to Confidence Intervals

Lecture Structure:

1. Intuition Behind CIs

2. Three steps of Confidence Interval Estimation

3. Large Sample Confidence Interval for the mean

4. Small Sample Confidence intervals for the Population mean

Additional Lecture: Focus on Understanding: The Logic of Confidence Intervals

 

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Lecture 4: Confidence Intervals for two means and for proportions

Lecture Structure:

1. CI for two independent means

2. CI for two paired means

3. CI for one proportion

4.  Sample size determination

 

 

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Lecture 5: Introduction to Hypothesis Tests

Lecture Structure:

1. Statistical Significance

2. Logic behind hypothesis tests

3. The four steps of hypothesis testing

4. Hypotheses about the population mean

·         large samples

·         small samples

 

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Lecture 6: Hypothesis Tests for Proportions & Two Populations


Lecture Structure:

1. Review of Significance

2. Review of one sample tests on the mean

3. Hypothesis tests about Two population means

·         Homogenous variances

·         Heterogeneous variances

4. Deciding on whether variances are equal

5. Hypothesis tests about proportions

·         One population

·         Two populations

 

 

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SSS1 Lecture 7: Regression

Lecture Structure:

  1. Linear and non-linear relationships

  2. Fitting a line using Ordinary Least Squares

  3. Inference in Regression

  4. Omitted Variables and R2

  5. Categorical Explanatory Variables 

  6. Summary

 

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Revision Lecture I: Sampling Distributions & Confidence Intervals

Lecture Structure:

1. Histograms & Density Functions

2. Sampling Distributions

3. Confidence Intervals

 

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Revision Lecture II: Hypothesis Tests

Lecture Structure:

1. Statistical Significance

2. Logic behind hypothesis tests

3. The four steps of hypothesis testing

4. Hypotheses about the population mean

     4.1 when you have large samples

     4.2 when you have small samples

5. Levene’s test

6. Further Exercises

Answers to Further Exercises:

Click here to download the answers to the further exercises listed at the end of Revision Lecture II.

 

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Text Box: (check Grad School Handbook for exact date)
 

Text Box: SSS1 Assignment Due December 2012 : 

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Text Box:   Data for Social Science Statistics I:

Click here for a zipped folder that contains all the data files (except for the x_bar__ dataset) for the Inference and Statistics textbook or click on the link below:

These files should be copied into a folder on your C: drive called STATISTICS (i.e. C:\STATISTICS).  The datasets are also available below as separate files:

These files should also be available from the Q:\QUANTS folder of the Adam Smith Labs.  If you plan to use these data sets on campus but from other lab computers, you might want to copy these files onto your H:\ drive.

 

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Text Box:   Macros for Social Science Statistics I: For Home Use

The lab machines will hopefully have the macros installed by the time you come to need them (if not, see the next section).  If you plan to use the macros on your own PC, however, you will need to download the following four files to utilise the macros described in the text (save the files to C:QUANTS directory which you will need to create if you have not done so already).  Click on the file names to download or open them:

Once you have downloaded the files it will improve ease of use if you customise the syntax-window menu bar in SPSS. Detailed instructions on how to do this are given in the installation instructions:

If you would rather not install these macros on your hard-drive, you can instead save only the datafile one.sav to the C:QUANTS directory (which you will need to create if it does not already exist), and open and run the entire QUANTSCOMMANDS.SPS file directly from this website each time you open up SPSS. You should then be able to use all the macros listed in the textbook.

 

 

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Text Box:   Text Box:   Macros for Social Science Statistics I: For ASB Labs

If the macros have not been installed on the lab machine you are using, you can still access the macros by opening the file below, highlighting all its contents by pressing CTRL+A and running the whole lot as though it were one command. You will need to do this every time you start a new session in SPSS.

 

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Text Box:   Material for Social Science Statistics 1 (Previous Years) 

 

 


For the 2009/2010 lab exercises & guide to reading, click here

 

2009 Assignment: Social Science Statistics 1 Course Assignment (due Tues 15th December 2009)

Click on the links below to access the files needed for the assignment:

  • For revised version of project brief click here.
  • For main dataset click here (SPSS data file).

For examples of the superheroes developed by the primary school children see:

Other files that may be needed for the assignment:

 


Syntax, data and teaching/learning resources associated with this book are available below.

Inference and Statistics in SPSS is not just another SPSS manual but an innovative and integrated approach to learning introductory statistics using one of the world’s best-selling statistical software packages.  It will be an invaluable resource for students of business or social science who want to use statistics in the real world, to tackle real research problems, using real data. 

Further details at the bottom of this page.

 

 



Stata for dummies -- for lab notes clear here.

Task sheet for Intro to SPSS

General Introduction to SPSS:

Lecture Structure:

A. Data Types

      1. Variables

      2. Constants

B. Introduction to SPSS

      1. SPSS Menu Bar

      2. File Types

C. Tabulating Data

      1. Categorical variables

      2. Continuous variables

D. Graphing Data

      1. Categorical variables

      2. Continuous variables



The following slides provide an introduction to basic statistical concepts and offer a brief overview of the one semester course, Social Statistics I:

  • For M&S Lecture 1 click here
  • For M&S Lecture 2 click here
  • For M&S Lecture 3 click here
  • For M&S Lecture 4 click here
  • For M&S Lecture 5 click here
  • For M&S Lecture 6 click here
  • For M&S Tutorial, await update.



For the 2009/2010 lab exercises & guide to reading, click here.



2009 Assignment: Social Science Statistics 1 Course Assignment (due Tues 15th December 2009)

Click on the links below to access the files needed for the assignment:

  • For revised version of project brief click here.
  • For main dataset click here (SPSS data file).

For examples of the superheroes developed by the primary school children see:

Other files that may be needed for the assignment:



SSS1 Lecture 1: Density curves and the CLT

Lecture Structure:

  1. Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion

  2. Density curves & Symmetrical Distributions

  3. Normal Distribution

  4. Central Limit Theorem


SSS1 Lecture 2: Calculating z-Scores 

Lecture Structure:

  1. Find probabilities from zi (click here for table of probabilities)

  2. Find zi from a given probability

  3. Find zi and probability from xi

  4. Apply z scores to sampling distributions


SSS1 Lecture 3: Introduction to Confidence Intervals 

Lecture Structure:

  1. Intuition behind confidence intervals

  2. Three steps of confidence interval estimation

  3. Large sampe confidence interval for the mean

  4. Small sample confidence interval for the mean


SSS1 Lecture 4: Confidence Intervals for Various Applications 

Lecture Structure:

  1. CI for two independent means

       1.1 Pooled Variances

       1.2 Different Variances

  2. CI for two paired means

  3. CI for one proportion

  4. Sample size determination

SSS1 Lecture 5: Introduction to Hypothesis Tests 

Lecture Structure:

  1. Statistical Significance

  2. The four steps of hypothesis testing

  3. Hypotheses about the population mean


SSS1 Lecture 6: Hypothesis Tests for Proportions & 2 Populations

Lecture Structure:

  1. Review of Significance

  2. Review of one sample tests on the mean

  3. Hypothesis tests about Two population means

  • Homogenous variances
  • Heterogeneous variances

  4. Deciding on whether variances are equal

  5. Hypothesis tests about proportions

  • One population
  • Two populations


SSS1 Lecture 7: Relationships Between Categorical Variables 

Lecture Structure:

  1. Independent Events

  2. Contingent Events

  3. Chi-square Test for Independence

  4. Further Study


SSS1 Lecture 8: Regression

Lecture Structure:

  1. Linear and non-linear relationships

  2. Fitting a line using Ordinary Least Squares

  3. Inference in Regression

  4. Omitted Variables and R2

  5. Categorical Explanatory Variables 

  6. Summary


SSS1 Slides from 2006:

  • For Quants I Lecture 2 click here
  • For Quants I Lecture 3 click here
  • For Quants I Lecture 4 click here
  • For Quants I Lecture 5 click here
  • For Quants I Lecture 6 click here
  • For Quants I Lecture 7 click here
  • For Quants I Lecture 8 click here

Click here for table of probabilities for the z-distribution

For the syntax "answers" for selected lab exercises, click on the relevant link below (these files assume you are using a lab computer):

If you are working from your own PC (as opposed to a lab PC) you will find the following versions of files more useful since the syntax refers to the C:\ drive, rather than the Q:\ and H:\ drives:

Data for Social Science Statistics I:

Click here for a zipped folder that contains all the data files (except for the x_bar__ dataset) for the Inference and Statistics textbook or click on the link below:

These files should be copied into a folder on your C: drive called STATISTICS (i.e. C:\STATISTICS).  The datasets are also available below as separate files:

These files should also be available from the Q:\QUANTS folder of the Adam Smith Labs.  If you plan to use these data sets on campus but from other lab computers, you might want to copy these files onto your H:\ drive.

Macros for Social Science Statistics I: For Home Use

The lab machines will hopefully have the macros installed by the time you come to need them (if not, see the next section).  If you plan to use the macros on your own PC, however, you will need to download the following four files to utilise the macros described in the text (save the files to C:QUANTS directory which you will need to create if you have not done so already).  Click on the file names to download or open them:

Once you have downloaded the files it will improve ease of use if you customise the syntax-window menu bar in SPSS. Detailed instructions on how to do this are given in the installation instructions:

If you would rather not install these macros on your hard-drive, you can instead save only the datafile one.sav to the C:QUANTS directory (which you will need to create if it does not already exist), and open and run the entire QUANTSCOMMANDS.SPS file directly from this website each time you open up SPSS. You should then be able to use all the macros listed in the textbook.

Macros for Social Science Statistics I: For ASB Labs

If the macros have not been installed on the lab machine you are using, you can still access the macros by opening the file below, highlighting all its contents by pressing CTRL+A and running the whole lot as though it were one command. You will need to do this every time you start a new session in SPSS.

Mind Maps for Social Science Statistics I:

Mindmaps can be viewed using Mindjet's free viewer software which can be downloaded by clicking here and selecting the button labelled Get Mindjet MindManager Viewer.

  • For overview of SSS I course, click here
  • For mindmap of Confidence Intervals, click here (coming soon)
  • For mindmap of Hypothesis tests, click here (coming soon)