As a plant ecologist and conservation biologist, I am fascinated with the vast diversity of plants on Earth and how they interact with their environment and other organisms. I am particularly interested in how climate change, urbanization, and other anthropogenic factors affect plant communities. Understanding anthropogenic impacts to plants is compelling to me for two main reasons:1) humans exert a large and growing influence on Earth's biota, and 2) we can simultaneously learn about their basic ecology and address applied problems in conservation biology and restoration.


I have broad interests and have worked in diverse systems ranging from Pacific Northwest montane forests and tropical bee communities in coffee farms to suburban vernal pool amphibians and coastal sandplain grassland communities.


News & Updates

December 2015: Happy Holidays! Among other things, I enjoyed exploring Washington, D.C. and New York City over the holidays with my family. A couple of botanical highlights of the season: 1) visiting model train exhibits at the U.S. Botanic Garden and the NY Botanic Garden- both gorgeous and the perfect places for a botanist and her train-obsessed three-year old, and 2) seeing cherry trees blooming on the national mall- a result of the wacky warm weather we had this December.


November 2015: Fall observations of phenology are winding down, and I had a chance to look at some of the phenology data collected by volunteers for the first year of the Tree Spotters program at Arnold Arboretum. Here’s a short summary available at the Temporal Ecology Lab blog


October 2015: I’m thrilled that our paper on citizen science was cited in a White House memo! Check out the huffington post article, if the memo is too much for you...


September 2015: I’ve recently begun to collaborate with Andy Royle, a fabulous statistician at USGS who is my new mathmatical mentor for my postdoctoral fellowship. Looking forward to learning more Bayesian hierarchical modeling techniques from him, as well as exploring the wildlife refuge where his office is located!






Contact Information:

Ailene Ettinger, PhD

NSF Postdoctoral Fellow


Ailene.Ettinger@tufts.edu,aettinger@fasmail.harvard.edu

 

Ailene K. Ettinger

All photos by Ailene Ettinger, unless otherwise stated.