Linked from the full results from the 2012 State of Clojure survey.

General comments?

Thanks for your efforts!

We have been building our business on clojure for over a year and a half. We pretty much have the whole development process sorted for our set of problems. If the language was causing us problems, we would have switched ages ago. We're not afraid of java code, and the inter-op story with clojure is great, so we don't have problems with libraries. We have had a total of 3 bugs that we think would have been caught with a type system, so we don't miss that. The biggest problem we have is that things like datomic make me jealous, but we've written too much code to switch now.

This is random, but so far the conferences are not very compatible with observance of the Jewish sabbath. I'd love to see them shift to not be on Saturdays.

Clojure put the fun back in software development for me at a point where I was disillusioned and close to a career change (even though I started programming when I was 10yrs old). Now I'm programming Clojure 12hrs a day for the tech startup I founded and I absolutely love it.

 

I started working on my software almost two years ago, and every step along the was was confirmation that Clojure was a fantastic tool for the job.

 

The Clojure community is extremely knowledgable, very friendly and helpful, and generally just really awesome - a huge and fundamental difference from the Ruby On Rails and PHP world — RoR and PHP are the Burger King and McDonalds of programming, while Clojure is this fantastic little bistro with a world-class chef that's a well-known secret with the locals.

I wish it had startup time of Go. I really want clojurec to succeed because this means I'll be able to write command line tools in Clojure.

 

Also, I wish CLJS never used Google Closure. I think this is unrealistic wish. :)

Thanks for doing the survey!

cemerick, please do more of your excellent podcast :-)

 

Also, I think that question about targets for ClojureScript should be checkboxes rather than radios.

clojure/core should wake up about asking people to mail pieces of paper and then wait for 2 months even for the tiniest of patches. Even very experienced community members I know do not want to contribute to Clojure because of that "ivory tower" process.

Great community, awesome language, can't wait to see how it will evolve this year (especially interested in typed-clojure lately, I have high hopes for Ambrose's work), and what next platform the language will be facehugging next.

 

Also wondering what will be this years' Rich surprise (we don't hear a lot from him lately, either datomic is taking all his time (I hope for him it is a success really), or he is cooking something awesome.

Clojure rocks!

I haven't yet used Clojure for anything "big" but have found it to be a delight for small projects.

Clojure rocks.

 

Maybe future surveys could ask about meetup/conference participation?

Thank all of the people who have written books, tools, libs, etc.  

Love Clojure and want any excuse to use it!...

I'm happy about the state of Clojure at the moment. There are many practically as well as philosophically good aspects. Also there are many libraries, albeit they are often version 1 and the future will see much better libraries with better abstractions. I'm hoping progress goes on!

cKanren is going to be awesome!

<3

You missed out EuroClojure! That was a great conference. :-)

Thanks for doing this!

I wrote clojure-py, so my using it "in production" is a bit biased. ;-)

Keep up the good work, you guys rock.

Thanks for putting this together.

Clojure is an important language in that it is helping to raise awareness and gain mind-share for the Lisp family.  

Love

Last year at this time I was writing Clojure for work every day. I felt more productive and smarter than I've felt in a long time. The project I was working on ended up getting scrapped and I'm back to Scala for my day-to-day. I keep looking, though, for places to sneak it in and grow it.

I appreciate Clojure, the language, but I also equally appreciate the strong focused message that Rich Hickey and the leaders in the Clojure community are conveying. I don't always get to use Clojure but I always try to apply the principles from Clojure to whatever I am doing.

I'm still a huge Clojure fan and I'm looking for every opportunity to bring it mainstream at work  (large, legacy, java enterprise web application suite)

Clojure is nice, I absolutely love it and will investigate more in it. Would love to see CLJS to be more widespread in use as JS really sucks.

loop/recur makes me a little sad. In general I absolutely love Clojure. I never want to go back to Java (or any language lacking lambdas/closures).

Overall, I love clojure. awesomeness.

Great language, makes programming fun again.

Thanks for doing this for the community.

Clojure is improving at a very rapid rate, and I thoroughly enjoy the language.

it is the first language where I found it easy to get involved in the community; it is also the first that I wanted to get involved.

when saying 'approachable/comprehensive documentation' I'm referring to the quality of the API documentation. Most just give you the bird's level view and in the end you have to read the source yourself to really see what these functions are doing. If we're having to read the source, we can spare with the documentation. This is especially true of clojure's core API, but also many of the former 'contrib' libraries set a low example of documentation. Then again, fixing that is only one patch away...

Clojure is awesome, biggest advantage I get from it is ease of working with data structures and seqs in general, next is FP and immutability - those make code much easier to reason about. I like protocols but rarely find a need for them.

Also IMHO people should be punished for wrapping Hibernate in Clojure, glad it happened so late ;-)

I love Clojure so much, I want to give it a kitten. It's the first language on the JVM that hasn't made me hate life, and the first Lisp I've found myself actually able to use for real-world problems. I love the philosophy of de-complecting features into their own tools. I love eval-ing code from my Emacs buffer into a running process and immediately seeing the changes.

I love Clojure - it helps me think.

Need to find a way to help non-experts understand what Clojure is with minimal overhead of understanding tools ...

Really enjoying the language, and the ways of thinking about things that Clojure and the Clojure community provides.

 

Haven't been exposed to the clojure community much, but from what I have seen, everyone seems helpful, and willing to share their insights.

Thanks!

The conjs are the best conferences I have been to.

Great job on the survey. Glad to see it expanded for "Clojure on platform X."

Clojure is great. I'm However, there seems to be no documentation/tutorials/anything about ClojureScript.

Clojure is really, really cool!

Community needs more people like @cemerick! :)

 

Runtime performance as a frustrating aspect probably more due to my lack of skill in utilizing Clojure efficiently, rather than a problem in Clojure itself.

Please don't let community becomes like those on comp.lang.lisp :D

Enjoying learning the language. Makes a refreshing change from C#/OO.

Excited about ClojureC!

 

Also, you omitted Clojurescript-Lua https://github.com/raph-amiard/clojurescript-lua from the table of Clojure implementations above.

 

Clojure is awesome, the community is full of smart people and Rich Hickey is a source of inspiration. Too bad for that hairstyle...

what percent of these questions  were asked last year? how many are new? Clojure is diverse now, maybe needs specific questions on a per library basis??

go Lisp (in any incarnation)!

thanks for doing this!

really love Clojure so much!!

I am by no means an advanced programmer.  Having the opportunity to participate and learn from programmers like Rich, David Nolen, Fogus, and the Stus (Sierra and Halloway) has been amazing to me.  I have learned more about programming in 3 years than the last 10 (when I have just tinkered).  

 

However, the fleas come with the dog: these advanced programmers sometimes seem like they are leaving some of us behind with the lack of an easy to use IDE that works with both clojure and clojurescript just out of the box.

 

Thanks for this great language! Clojure has made programming FUN.

Love the language; good community too.

I'd love to see more serious work on clojurec! Also, I've REALLY love to see a lang level for Clojure in Dr. Racket, since it is such a nice environment for LISP. Bonus points for getting the REPL working inside it too! I see only one repo on Github tackling this (clojure-racket), and it hasn't been updated in a while, so maybe I'll add onto that.

Good luck getting a fix in to Clojure core if it doesn't affect the Datomic project.

I love all the videos, podcasts, conference talks, etc. about what people are doing with clojure and the community looks awesome. Those things are what motivated me to learn clojure and have made the process so enjoyable.

Clojure has come further than I could have hoped for in the past few years, and I'm thrilled to see where it goes next.

I would personally like to thank Rich Hickey for introducing me to the fantastic world/possibilities of functional programming and the broader Lisp paradigm.

 

The introduction of Lisp (specifically Clojure) into my daily work has been a fantastic intellectual/productivity boon. I now frame problems in entirely new, functional ways.

 

If I could go back and do it again, I would probably skip over OOP, Java, C++, C# and kin, and go straight to functional programming!

Thanks!

Clojure is great, however the slow pace of development really kills community motivation for core contributions.

I always wanted to learn a lisp, and  Clojure made it possible. #awesome

still going strong!

I love Clojure for the way it changes your coding-style through immutability. I love the development-process with SLIME in emacs, a repl is not enough for me, after going back to python I am totally bugged by not having SLIME. The quality of most libraries is really good. I am sure that everybody who got to a certain point in Clojure will stick to it, but it is a hard sell in companies that are keen on python because every beginner falls into a trap of class path issues and import when playing around after a while.

I LIEK CHOCOLATE MILK!

1. There should be a similar survey for Leiningen, which is arguably the first killer app of Clojure.

2. This survey is a fantastic way to collect and disseminate information about the Clojure eco-system.

3. I would be happy to contribute what I can to any efforts to address the issues I listed "Clojure's most glaring weakness...". I hope knowledgable people will pave the way for the likes of me.

soooooo excited about the conj

Chas thx for this wonderful effort.

Thanks for being a part of the awesome!

I really wish there was an official clojure-in-clojure interpreter I could study.

I love clojure, it's the first lisp I've really hooked onto but it's still not really suitable for use at my workplace so for the time being I'm just a fair weather friend.

Clarify that the jvm target is a minimum :)

Overtone got me serious about grokking the Clojure world about a week after I started playing with it from within Emacs. If those illusive Clojure stickers ever materialize, I want one for my Sennheiser headphones.

 

We do a lot of data processing (not "Big Data", just "lots of data") with the core parts in Java and the glue layers in Python. This week, I had a need to write an inline filter...er...mangler, and instead of doing it in Python like the rest, took a day and did it in Clojure. Man, it was a joy to build, and it snuck into our pre-production environment as an (uber)JAR without anyone noticing. Snappy, simple, and fun.

 

High five.

I have no real excuse for not having sent in a CA, but it seems like a pretty high bar for preventing *any* participation in core language development.  I can't even subscribe to the dev mailing list without having sent in a CA!  I (mostly) understand the desire to control code that way, but perhaps external resources like the mailing list, wiki, and even the website could be opened to accept patches from a wider range of sources.

Clojure looks really promising and your book is pure awesomness!

I haven't used Clojure as much as I'd like because it's not officially approved at the bank where I work. My outside work has focused on JRuby, although maybe I need to dedicate myself to a Clojure project.

In general, I've found Clojure modern, palatable and inspiring (much more so than older Lisp dialects). I wish for it to have a bright future, and for it to become a "data glue" language on many hosting platforms (e.g. clojure-py, native, the CLR).

A well thought out reference example project (or two or three) would facilitate more people adopting clojure, or at least make it easier for newbies to "get it".

its cool, keep up the good work. i hope i will use it in production some day with it elegant syntax ;)

Hope you keep contributing Chas - your various efforts are really appreciated.

The Clojure Programming book is awesome - enough detail that I have renewed hope that I can achieve Clojure enlightenment in this lifetime or the next...

 

There is a huge need to explain to people further what thinking functionally really means in practice.  Function composition ala F(G(X)) like in Algebra and higher order math is one way of describing it, but there needs to be a strong book or books and articles also that address what it is to build a system with bottom up and top down programming in the traditional Lisp way, but also stressing that functions and their ability to be composed comes from the understanding of levels of data and functions applied to that data being built up.  That keeping functions pure and side-affect free gives the ability to compose more easily.  These things all must be shown in much better clarity and at a level that is not just CS friendly.  It needs to be "everyman" friendly.  Everyman should be able to get the power and freedom provided by this approach and the programming world will be better for it.

 

Much in the same way programmers learned that everything isn't an Object, but some things are just data. We want every programmer whether they are at a level of using Basic, PHP or some other language that doesn't provide the high-order ideas that Lisp allows to be availed of the power. To do that doesn't mean bringing their languages up by patching on, but by bringing more clarity, more examples aimed at that group, more samples, etc. that really clarify and educate them up to the level of expecting that the power we have in Lisp is the power they should expect of all languages, all tools, etc.

 

Anyway, enough of my rant. If you need more feel free to contact me at: staypufd@mac.com or at sam.griffith@interactivewebsystems.com

 

Thanks for doing this survey. I am hopeful that Clojure will lead us back to the great things and great joy programming was when I did Smalltalk and Lisp (on Lisp Machines)

Great community

My cat's breath smells like cat food.

nice survey!

I'd like to see some REPL commands that help ease tedious things. I program frequently in Haskell using GHCi and have the ability to do things like reload files without having to write a bunch of code.

I ticked "Runtime performance" as both a win and a possible impediment for using Clojure in more places. Having previously used Python as my preferred language for exploratory programming and non-performance-critical parts, Clojure has almost completely replaced Python in that area and the performance win is big. I work on a commercial product primarily implemented in Java and am gradually replacing parts of it with Clojure. What I am unsure about at this point is whether I will be able to go all the way with Clojure instead of Java wrt performance. But here's hoping, because the domain (roughly NLP/IR) is well suited in my opinion :)

Love Clojure, keep up the good work.

Great for art, research, and having fun.

Thanks for doing the survey Chas!

I love Clojure. It makes programming fun!

I am about half-way through Clojure Programming and have found it to be an excelling programming language book in general.  It has helped me really grasp the fundamental philosophies, techniques and capabilities of the language.

Great survey except for two things: hard to pick the biggest wins, and hard to pick any from the most frustrating things list:).

 

Thanks for the survey and for the great work you are doing for the community!

 

It's funny that I've criticize some of the stuff in my own blog as well .. and now I feel that somebody is actually listening.

Still, I like Clojure a lot.

awesome!

Clojure is really exciting!

Thanks for doing this and thanks for all your quality contributions to the community!

Thanks for doing this.

Its made me a better programmer more than anything else Ive done over the last 15 years.

I love clojure.

 

It has a great community, very professional.

thx 4 super awesome survey

It is a pleasure.

I've done enough of these Clojure surveys now to know that the above paragraphs aren't what you want to hear, will never be counted as a summarized sentiment people in the community have, might hurt feelings etc. I guess I'm the only one that says this stuff into the survey, cuz I know a lot of guys say it to me.

 

So, you probably wanted something more like, yeah, boy, a compiler that just dumps its own stack trace when there's a flaw in the code it tries to compile. We should fix that. But keep up the great work, Clojure is the best!

The two things I need to write code for most often are web dev and automating sys admin tasks. Unfortunately clojure takes far too long to start to really use for CLI apps (keeping a close eye on clojurec for that!) and my experience with getting clojure running on a web server so far is that it uses up far too much RAM to fit into my current environment for my hobby projects.

I was drawn to Clojure by Rich Hickey's philosophy on functional programming, immutability, time, complexity, etc. I'm still not convinced Clojure's syntax is the way of the future (I prefer Haskell's syntax for example) but I think the philosophy behind Clojure is unbeatable.

I'm interested to see how the progression of Light Table changes the clojure landscape. It seems to have a lot of buzz around it from outside the clojure community and it is different from anything else out there. I think there are still a lot of ways it could fail but it will be fun to watch.

I love it. It's like to be back home, back to basics.

I think that the Clojure web site needs a serious overhaul. It's simple, it's easy, it's pragmatic, but it's not "selling" Clojure. That Clojure is a better Java than Java, for example, is not spelled out on the Clojure home page. This is an essential selling point for Clojure in the "enterprise" Java space.

 

I propose that we create a Kickstarter project to fund a complete overhaul of the Clojure web site by people with the right expertise for the job. I'm sure everyone in the community with ambitions to use Clojure as something more than a boutique hobby language will be more than happy to contribute. I'll pledge US$200 myself if something like this gets going. It's in my own self-interest after all! - Paul Dorman (paul.dorman@gmail.com).

Cheers for an eventually much more useful Clojars.

Thanks for ClojureDocs. Cheers for an eventually more useful ClojureDocs.

Overall, Clojure has been a huge win for us, providing dramatic performance and robustness improvements, as well as allowing us to grow an easily maintainable and flexible code base.

Awesome that ClojureScript and Datomic came out this year. I worry that there's too much surface area for any one person, even the benevolent hammock resident, to focus on.

 

I'm bummed that according to Github Clojure's ranking went from 17th to 23rd most popular – Scala is now ahead.

 

It's good that Relevance is expanding their training efforts.

 

I wish I could keep up with the Clojure Google groups.

 

Love seeing David Nolen and Ambrose Bierce be positive, effective figures on Twitter. Keep doing neat things!

 

I'm not sure why but I'm definitely more interested in Clojure/West than the Conj. I could easily go to both, but probably only the former. Alex knows how to hold a great conference.

 

I worry that Relevance seems to be losing more people than they are gaining. A lot of big names left this year. They are also not advertising on lispjobs.wordpress and not at my local Clojure meetup.

I love it. Programming became fun again like it was 15 years ago.

Good survey

I'm a beginner who's still trying to wrap his head around Clojure. I'm loving it so far. Feel free to email me@isaac.su or tweet @isaacsu

Sometimes the toolchain seems really brittle, it's less of a problem than with other languages but it would be a nice thing to say that isn't a problem with Clojure.

I find the Clojure mailing list to show a user base that is mostly ignorant of other Lisp dialects, which is a shame, as there is a lot of wisdom from, say, comp.lang.lisp that's absent, and we see people fumbling over problems solved long ago, making it seem as though we just keep starting over every few years in computer programming.

Chas, you need to come out of the closet about Emacs.

Everyone knows you're using it in secret, you can admit it now.

Come on.

 

 

My latest frustration has been leiningens version change. Some things require version 2 and some require version 1.

Once that you've made some progress on learning the very basics, there's a TON of materials scattered around the web, most of it is great quality stuff, including videos from conferences and such.

I love Clojure. It still seems very young and there are many active languages out there. To me (and many in the community) it seems that it's the future but I don't really know if we'll be able to win enough mindshare to be anything other than a niche language.

Really fun

Love learning such a powerful language. Also like how smart the community around it seems to be. Thanks all

Clojure/core is very quiet.

Thanks for doing the survey, Chas!

Continue your great work, Iv bought the book looking forward to future work

Still would love to see more clojure-in-clojure work. Easy interface to C libraries is why python is so popular in the numerical computing area and a similarly easy to interface C/LLVM clojure runtime would be very nice.

I only use Clojure because Datomic is really cool!

Although I'm still very new with Clojure, I think it's a great language.

 

I would like to see an implementation in Objective C (specifically for iOS).

Clojure is the best thing that has happened to programming in the last 25 years.

Clojure rocks!

i wish all languages had a leiningen

Thanks clojure,thank you.I  love clojure!

I wish there was a Lua equivalent for Clojure, easily embeddable but with all the bells and whistles. Compiling to C is not quite the same.

Same as all other languages: non-apparent dependency relationships on package, namespace and function level (even worse than in e.g. Java where you have at least some analysis tools and Dependency structure matrix) and manual management of modularity. This often leads to "Big Ball Of Mud" implementations, as there is no awareness (lack of visibility) and/or time to manually clean things up. On one side Clojure would have a bonus here as due to lack of implicit OO it has a much simpler baseline (just namespaces and functions) than e.g. Java, OTOH lack of static typing makes analysis tougher.

I can't over emphasize how difficult this is coming from my rudimentary/next-to-know-nothing condition.

 

I've had to learn/am-still trying to learn what is the best linux distro that will enable me to best obtain the foundations for my project? (jdk 7 postgres 9 emacs 24 leiningen 2) I'm trying debian and it's giving me headaches. I would pay hard cash for a dummies like book for getting into clojure, not just learning the language, but getting it to where I have a working environment where I can start building a datomic schema and clojure powered web app.

 

I know Rich Hickey talks about the difference between easy and simple. I don't want easy, but it would be nice if it got taken a notch down from insanely difficult.

Keep going. :)

It's good to see Clojure gaining popularity. I've been to conferences aimed at architects, C# devs, Java devs, and Clojure always seems to come up in conversation, always with positive feedback. It takes a good solid approach.

I love it... each time I use it I am excited about it.

Love the ideas involved. Concerned about the tools and debugging.

 

In practice I find it very hard to actually write Clojure code. A line of Clojure takes me around 10-20 times longer to write than a line of Python. I'm trying to write a game and I've bogged down to almost no progress because it seems so difficult.

I suspect lightable instarepl should be included in this year survey :)

i like Clojure! :)

I think Clojure is a very exciting and promising language. I'm looking forward to it's future. I really hope that someday it will become a mainstream language like Python or Java these days.

Really like it, having been a Schemer in uni years ago.  Really great for solving little puzzle problems and project Euler problems

Clojure is awesome :-)   I wish I had more time to learn to master it.

The first question on how long you have used clojure should include the option intermitently. Most people I know use it this way. Last survey I felt clojure was a bit too uninterested in the needs/wants of the "average" programmer but I think they've improved on that a bit. Clojure-contrib being broken up was the best idea of the past year (or 2). Leiningin and cake merging to give us leiningin version 2 means I now spen most of my (little) clojure time in the command line (n)REPL. I think more work needs to be done towards standardizing libraries i.e. documenting, searching, e.t.c. I don't find clojars terribly useful except for I know leiningin downloads jars from there. All in all I think it's going from strengt-to-strength but now needs to focus on the "average" folk :)

 

 

I love Clojure, it has made development interesting and challenging again. Thanks Rich.

 

My two pieces of advice:

# Just get stuck in, don't be afraid to feel stupid.

# Go to a conference. You will meet some very smart people, but also people just like yourself trying to learn how best to use Clojure.

Thank you for doing this survey. It helps the Clojure community to reflect and deduce steps necessary to take for a successful future of Clojure based on these reflections.

Also I'm really enjoying reading your Clojure book!

Happy to participate in the survey as I am learning Clojure and would like to build some useful applications. So, would like to know overall outcome of the survey for my future directions.

I am very grateful for Clojure, it has made me a much better developer.

 

Many thanks to everyone involved.

<3 Clojure (and the survey.. as you fished for it!)

Clojure is an eye opening experience if you get the chance to learn it. Its high level models and approach to programming are both inspiring and useful. Never having used a Lisp before, it truly delivered Eric Raymond's promise of making me a better programmer for (up until now, at least) the rest of my life.

Let's help Phil get swank-clojure back on track wrt. following slime development.

I wish ClojureScript became easier to install and use in web app projects. ClojureScript One does a good job, but it covers only a few aspects of web app development.

I have chosen Java for 2 specific projects that are now in production even though Clojure would have cut development time in half, because there is no chance anyone in the company but me would be able to support it.

enjoy programming with clojure, had stopped programming for a while

It's amazing to see how Rich and the whole Clojure core team managed to create such a wonderful JVM based Lisp dialect. And equally amazing to see how many people have started coding Clojure around the globe.

I'm a happy Clojure user! Looking forward to all the cool stuff that is coming!

 

About this survey, I think one missing in category of the biggest wins of Clojure is, is that the language is so extensible that one can build stuff like core.logic into the language. It might not be production-ready now, but it is the stuff that makes me really excited!

Clojure is an excellent language that makes a lot of sense to me. If there is something I need to do, it solution lies either in the core language or in a library like clojure-csv. I think better IDE environments that are easy to set up would be helpful. Compared to Scala, Clojure is a an uncomplicated language. Clojure-ites should talk that up more. I don't know scala, but have been trying to learn the syntax just to see what all the hub-bub is about.

 

It is still too hard to set up a development environment, though setting up lein is a lot nicer than setting up vimclojure.

 

The Clojure community for the most part is a good group of people, and they have been very helpful, as I have been trying to learn the language.

Thanks for doing this and for all the work you do for the Clojure community.

I love love love clojure.  How to convince my coworkers???

I'd love to see a 5 minute pre-recorded video by some industry luminary (Neal Ford or someone like that) talk directly to managers about why they should adopt clojure.  I'm thinking of something like when some movie star tells kids not to smoke or something, except longer and about clojure.  Then we can sit our managers down Clockwork Orange style and have them watch it.  5 minutes may not be much time, but my manager's attention span before ignoring things is probably less than that anyway.

 

To expand the idea even further, such a video could eventually be part of a "Clojure adoption toolkit for imprisoned developers". It could also include things like 1-page colorful charts and short quotes for managers to cling to and regurgitate when talking to their "superiors".

How much has work on Datomic taken momentum from Clojure?  I'm not sure, but I do wonder.

Great community, great language, really great books (I have read them all).  It would be nice if we could use this on iPhones/iPad's without jumping through hoops, but that may come over time.   I'd like to see minnow and clooj come together into a strong IDE, but maybe light table will overtake that effort.

Still learning, but I love the cohesive feel of the language. It doesn't seem like arbitrary, unnecessary features are added without justification.

Love Clojure! If only I could make my employees share my entusiasm... :-)

None.

The community is absolutely awesome.

I prefer more approachable languages like Haskell, Go, or even C.

I'm a total noob when it comes to Clojure, I come from a Python background and I'm currently involved in Java projects. I think it would be cool to learn some more about Clojure and how it can play with Hadoop (I work at Cloudera).

 

So far it's been a really cool experience!!

It's usually chilly in the morning in San Francisco, which means I need to bring a jacket to work, even in August.

Clojure is a wonderful programming language and I've truly enjoyed learning and using it! Keep up the good work!

Would have been good to include a question about the best books on clojure. There are many good ones, would have been interesting to see what folks like the most.

I wish Clojure could be compiled down to binaries. clojurec may solve that problem.

I read stuart halloway's book and after about 3/4 of it the only thought I had was "I should be using clojure for everything." It has changed the way I think about software development.

I'm examining Clojure, but I am very unhappy that it doesn't have an easy way to draw on extant Common Lisp code (or vice versa).

 

I like the idea of Lisp/JVM interop, but I have a notion that ABCL is a better software system to use, despite the Clojure community and momentum.

 

Also, it's a Lisp-1, ew.

Quite comprehensive and very nice.

Thanks for doing the survey!

Clojurescript is the shit

Thank you!

Thanks for doing it!

there is no way to get a mentor

I love the language and I love the amount of platforms it targets; it really feels like Clojure is a trusty tool in my belt that I can use no matter what the job. I've also found it is a great entry into functional languages for me. I have tried Haskell and Erlang and neither have taught me the functional concepts as quickly or easily as playing with Clojure has. Recursion actually feels easy now :D.

Clojure rocks. Period.

I still enjoy using it for my little projects, but still haven't been successful getting any adoption within my workplace.

You should ask people what their favorite Clojure books are.  I liked yours very much.

The thing about type safety is going to cause me to use Haskell in anger.

Still working on reading through the manuscript of your book that you sent me so that I can write a review of it.  (If you ignore the blog post drafts that are already fully written and ready to be posted,) that will be the next post I work on and publish.  Thanks!

 

-- Elango

Chas is the wind beneath my wings

I have used Clojure almost enough to be productive in it. At some point I expect to feel informed enough about deciding if its worth the additional trouble or not for using it over Java... Low level productivity, it seems like it. Higher level stuff? Don't know yet.

Clojure is absolutely and insanely great. I love it. Thank you Master Hickey !!!

 

I find that hype about ClojureScript strange: It is of course tempting to leverage

JavaScript's range, as every Browser speeks it. But: JavaScript is as beautiful

as Clojure. And anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't understand JavaScript.

And Browser incompatibilities aren't a problem anymore with all the high end normalizers

available these days. Futhermore, it attracts the wrong people.

That energy should be spend otherwise.

 

I find the energy put into attracting newbies very strange.

Lisps will never ever rule the world. Probably for the same

reason, that most people will never ever be attracted to Algebra.

That energy should be spend otherwise.

 

I would *very* much like Clojure on C. That would kick common lisp's old venerable ass !

A lot of energy should be spend there.

I do like that ClojureScript was mentioned in the survey, and I have great hope for its future development. I haven't actually used clojurescript for any production code yet primarily because without the advanced compilation option I feel that the javascript files generated for even very small programs are unacceptably large, and with advanced compilation for its dead code removal it becomes a nightmare to debug.

I wanted another option between "Investigating" and "No plans to investigate" for the different runtime options, a la "I hope to look into this at some point"; I put "I've never heard of it" instead for those.

 

Discoverability continues to be a challenge for me, but I think that's mostly because I haven't made the time to go exploring.

 

I'd like to see more Documentation on things like Leiningen, ClojureScript, and Overtone, but maybe they're out there and I just haven't found them yet. Most of what I have come across seems pretty fragmented and with the rapidly changing landscape of some of these tools it is hard to tell what is still relevant and what has been superceded--part of this is because a lot of what I find is old blog posts by someone who was trying to do something and decided to share it with the world. (For example, I worked through Chris Granger's little web-based controller for Overtone about a week ago and had to do a few things significantly differently than he did). That having been said I do realize, especially with the blog posts, there's really nothing that can be done unless the authors of said posts decide to start maintaining them and upgrading them to work with the latest versions of stuff (psssh, who has time for that?!). Perhaps this is all a necessary side-effect of such rapid growth. Furthermore, I absolutely LOVE the ClojureDocs.org site; I wish more of the libraries had similar repositories of knowledge and especially examples!

 

Thanks for all of your work with the language and helping spread it; overall I think it is fantastic and I look forward to using it more and more in the future.

Other points of clojurey pain:

* slowness of most scripting/command-line tools

* absolutely dreadful error reporting in core and in command-line tools (eg leiningen will sooner throw 5 pages of traceback than any useful and actionable error)

* difficulty of finding not only libraries but the "right" version of a library, especially as clojure does not allow specifying "get the latest" during e.g. development (fixing a version is sensible for production, but just annoying when playing around)

 

Makes it much harder to seriously give a shot at clojure when coming from a good ecosystem (Ruby, Python, Perl, ...)

So far Clojure has been a breath of fresh air coming from C/C++/Python. I find that I'm using it more and more and in the next year should have much more to say about it.

thanks for doing this, and thanks for your book + nrepl + other contributions to the community

I'm still probing Clojure for weaknesses, but so far Clojure has had way fewer frustrating bits than Ruby or Python.  Its java interop has been a huge part of its appeal.  A judicious application of macros in combination with use of java's reflection APIs has made working with existing java codebases not quite pleasant, but bearable.

 

One bit that I don't quite like is how the quasiquote operation appears to get expanded at the reader layer, making it impossible to do (read-string "'`(foo ~(rand))"), i.e. to do a quoted quasiquotation - the returned form will instead be a bunch of sequence manipulation operations. This is something that I feel Scheme gets right, and which no other lisp seems to - `(foo bar) in scheme is entirely equivalent to (backquote (foo bar)), which allows localized hacking of the backquote operator within a lexical context, among other things. It's not a huge problem, which is why I didn't put it under glaring weaknesses/blind spots, but it does bother me a bit.

clojure is cool :D

Clojure is neat. I like potato salad with dill pickles.

Still an awesome language, nothing has changed about that. :)

I love that you do this survey every year. On behalf of the Clojure community.. Thank You!

I love clojure. I am trying to promote at my work place. But I fail to defend using it. It would be helpful if some authority on clojure lists out it strengths and weakness.

It's really great to work with a lisp on the JVM. Wouldn't mind seeing more Java interop stuff left by the wayside.  Would really like to see a Clojure/core that compares with Java's standard library.

Clojure's nice. It's brought the fun back to programming for me!

I love that I can keep most of the core language in my head while I'm working on stuff.  

 

Once I get clojure code working, it works very well indeed; I replaced a production python tornado service with clojure, and it went from always having problems/going down, to something that is rock solid, has never crashed, and is highly stable in the system resources it uses.

 

The Clojurescript compilation process and how to integrate with existing javascript code has been a continuing pain point for me. The appropriate place to split code between ClojureScript and javascript is a subtle and difficult problem, from my perspective.

Learning Clojure and being a part of the community has enriched my life in many ways.  I just hope it keeps expanding in interesting directions so I can keep learning new things and meeting new people.

I think you're doing great work pushing the community forward. Thanks for your efforts.

I fully believe clojure is at the forefront of the new generation of languages, and I'm excited to see it push forward the standards for other languages.

Clojure is an absolute joy for me to work in, even in spite of a few weaknesses in tooling and environment support (which have definitely been decreasing!).

I like Clojure and feel like it can much more then Ruby for handling complex business logic.

I also glanced over your book and it looks very promising, thank you for your commitment into this very interest language.

CLJS interpreter!

Its a great language. With more free time I'd like to use it in any project I possibly can.

REPLs rock.  ;-)

STICKERS!  You should provide a way to get clojure stickers online!

Clojure.org isn't very nice compared to clojure.com or even clojuredocs.  

You did a really good job with your book.  Thanks.

Clojure is my favorite coding community (not that I really participate) and I'm looking forward to watching the mindshare grow.

* survey: It would have been cool to have "using data instead of Domain classes" as an entry for "What have been the biggest wins for you in using Clojure?"

 

* Initiatives like "clojure Atlas" are great and should be more "marketed"(?), this is very beginner friendly (and also great for exprienced Clojurian). And it's not even on the front page of clojure.org (same for clojuredocs.org)

 

* Thank you :) For gathering informations which may help improving Clojure's success (and thank you too for clojureatlas, I am using it all the time, I should pay for it, oops, will do ASAP)

 

* I am a poor Java developer "I would do Clojure for food" So if you search for Clojure devs working remotely, I am available :)

Thanks to RH.

It's a lovely language.

Great book, thanks.

Clojure is the only programming language I enjoy using today. Wonderfully done, everyone.

I hope the Clojure core team will continue to focus on practicality, user-friendliness, and on reducing the cognitive load a programmer has to deal with.

I am voting for neither candidate in the US national election because neither has sufficiently conveyed to me his support for future success of Clojure.

Thanks for doing this!

great survey, looking forward to the results.

Missing question: "Do you like the direction Clojure's going in?"  - Yes! :)

Thanks for taking the time to maintain it.

 

Major Clojure projects like leiningen, incanter, quil, overtone should be allowed to register as clojure.org subdomains,

 

eg.

 

leiningen.clojure.org

incanter.clojure.org

 

rather than have to pay for their own domains elsewhere.

It's easier to write java in Clojure than it is to write java in java.

Great community :)

Just forgot to mention Eclipse + ccw in the last submission!

Let's hope some of the issues get fixed as it's an amazing community and language!

Really pleased with clojure.  As IDE's improve and new platforms are targeted I'll use it more.  

Seems like there are four or five copies of dead libs on clojars, for a variety of github accounts. Hard to determine which is canonical; I wish our community were better at handing off/coalescing dead projects. Error messages and stack traces are incomprehensible, especially from the compiler.

I like Clojure a lot.

I love the ideas, and Clojure's gotten me into LISP in general. I'd like it to have more the feel of a scripting language as far as development goes (not the core language).

I haven't seen any new episodes of Mostly Lazy lately; I really enjoy those!  Thank you for putting them together!

 

(gen-class ...) can it be done without AOT compilation?

 

Oh, one more: the old contrib had a really great function called fmap for performing a (map ...) on the elements of a hash-map and keeping the outputs keyed to the same values in an output hash-map. Where did that go?

 

Thank you for putting this survey together!

Clojure is great!

 

I am a Java Developer. I am used to building Classes and UML type hierarchies.

I am used to laying out an architecture, something fixed and static.

Clojure/lisp seems to be a different kind of beast. Instead of laying out classes for screens, it seems I should be putting together data structures that represent screens. And then use Functions/Macro's to create data that can be pipe-lined into something like seesaw and have it generate a screen on-the-fly. Or with Macro's at compile time.

 

I end up with screens but without hard-coded panels/jFrames with hard-coded fields.

 

So, I think that working in a functional environment/lisp provides me with a faster simpler, boiler-plate free environment built on data.

Idiomatic Clojure was the hardest thing to learn. Joy of Clojure was the first time I felt it was really presented.

Docs don't explain why anything would be used, nor which other functions you'll use something with. Protocol docs were completely misleading. Need a good library of books to have references for common stuff (eg. Practical Clojure for protocols & deftype, Joy of Clojure to see that a protocol gets extended to Object to implement toString).

Feel like I needed to know almost as much as everyone in the community in order to discuss with them.

Lack of types in complex structures can lead to runtime bugs that a type system would trivially avoid.

Command-line compiling seems unnecessarily complex.

I don't want to program in any other language, but sometimes it's hard when things don't seem to make sense.

Thanks for this survey, it allowed me to put some thought into what I'm looking for in Clojure.

Incredibly smart and helpful community and my favorite language.  

I <3 Chas.

Chas, Thanks for putting together the survey.

 

Clojure/core - don't take it personally. People are only aggro because they love Clojure and the work that's been done. The whole... with great power comes great responsibility.

 

Clojure community, you guys are insanely awesome.

 

Other people external to the Clojure/Core are doing Clojure in Clojure and Clojure in C. What's happening with Clojure/Core and CinC? Is this dead?

The IDE issue is improving, CCW is heading in the right direction, e.g. usable auto-complete

I really enjoy developing clojure and would love to do it all day.

I'd like to hear more from Rich Hickey and the other main guys about what they are doing or have in mind for future releases.

 

Unless you're in that dev-circle, you're completely in the dark regarding Clojure's future.

 

I'd like to hear more both to satisfy my curiosity and to assure myself and the community that Clojure actually has a future and is not becoming abandonware little by little.

 

Beginning to _love_ Clojure! :-)

<3 Clojure.

+1 for the survey. Like last time, very good idea.

 

Clojure is :

- great

- multi-paradigm

- made me a better developer in my 'pseudo' primary one.

- is now my language and it's really my first in which i truly engage.

 

Great ideas tend to take a long time to be adopted.

Not so long ago, GNU/Linux was laughed at. Now it's not.

 

Do not despair, just wait.

It's time.

 

clojure as modern variant of lisp is fun

"All your Maven repositories belong to us."

Clojure is the greatest thing that happened to me in life. It restored to me the joy of programming.

thanks to everyone

When I first learned Ruby in 2001, I really wanted it to win, but I found the lack of open source libraries and tooling too much to overcome, and eventually found myself back in Java-land.  In hindsight, I wish I rolled up my sleeves and contributed rather than complained, but I still had projects to complete and work to do, and the practicalities may have prevented this anyway.  Clojure is at a point where a few key improvements could help it really take off tremendously.  Now I use it as much as possible, but occasionally find myself reluctantly switching back to Java or other tools to get a project done due to some rough edges.  I love this language and it has taught me a lot.  I would like to see the tooling and information organization surpass that of Java.

It needs big vendor support or it will always be very difficult for me to convince management or peers at work to use it.

I actually ended up going back to Common Lisp, the performance issues on the JVM (especially startup times, but not solely) were unacceptable.

Love Clojure, if only the Eclipse and IntelliJ plugins were good enough to convince others, I'm sure it has improved by now, the last time I used them, the counterclockwise plugin would just error out and the IntelliJ plugin is too rudimentary.

Really love the community.  They're smart, friendly, and helpful.

I think Clojure is confronted with the dilemma of whether it wants to be elitist (in a good way), take over the world or find a way to do both.

In general, I think Clojure is awesome. Thanks for doing the survey again!

Cojure would be more awesome with the Actor model instead of STM.

I like the survey, keep on the good work! I hope that for the next year's survey I can fill-in more insightful answers and perhaps even show some further community involvement from my part... Things are looking good for Clojure and me. Studying the language and its features has been very refreshing and thought provoking for me. I hope to get my hands dirty with a "serious" hobby project quite soon in the near future.

Clojure is incredible and the community is also.  There is so much potential, but people are busy using Clojure for their own needs and there hasn't been much in the way of "PR".

 

Thanks so much for managing this survey!

A new language gives people a fresh start and fresh hope. Although that may not be the intention of the creator or the community, I feel there is a kind of "hype" going on. That hype blinds certain people from seeing the weakness, and turns away some people who feel they have been cheated. I feel Clojure has good potential because it chose JVM as its launch pad, and actually instroduced some novel useful features in addition to the original LISP goodness, but I would not say it is a great language yet. I hope more people can realize that so it eventually can be great.

Apart from "Clojure is Awesome", you mean? :) I'm grateful that I'm getting to work with this language and platform at this moment :)

Thanks.

Clojure rocks, and the community is generally *extremely* helpful and supportive.  It is the only language I've used where clarity, concision, and performance don't work at cross purposes.

This is very helpful to the community, thank you!

 

Clojure community and the projects that come out of it are amazing, and one of the main thing that keeps me interested in the language.

 

Feedback on the patches I've submitted in Jira would encourage me to contribute to Clojure more.

Thanks for making this survey! You rule.

love clojure and the community of cool&clever people

theres lots iof exciting projects like incanter, overtone,reimann, storm, datomic, lighttable etc

Thanks Clojure, programming is fun again!

[And thanks Chas for running this survey ;]

Clojure is the language I most enjoy programming in. I look forward to seeing what improvements come next!

cool lang! I love it.

As a community we need to do a better job of collaborating and pushing patches up to library maintainers.  Otherwise we are left with "github forks gone wild" resulting in millions of orphaned libraries.

 

Keep it up!

The clojure cheat sheet is great

Very happy with literature (books and online docs, especially clojuredocs.org) and libraries. Great to see everyone converged on lein. Recent improvements to repl (lein2, nrepl, reply) have been great. I like to see efforts like IClojure to get the repl closer to capabilities or R, IPython, and Pry. Still a little ways to go, colors (and maybe some shortcuts) being the last obvious needed improvements. Nice to see new user groups popping up. Recently joined a Portland, OR group.

 

I was attracted to clojure 6 months ago by the "7 Languages in 7 Weeks" book. We need more language comparisons like that to make obvious why clojure is the obvious choice.

Looking forward to playing with LightTable some more.

still a great language, keep it up

Loved lisp dialect and Clojure running on the JVM made my bet to do my thesis, but I'm stuck about how to proceed with this language. I guess I need to program more solely in Clojure to come up with a veredict.

Very nice community (now even with a european conference :-)

Still very happy to have found a functional language that integrates with my day job duties better than Haskell does...

Really like the pragmatic approach to language design

Btw.: thanks for your excellent book. Still helps a lot, currently exploring Ring and Enlive.

I am really a dynamic languages guy professionally, particularly Python.  In my dream world, Clojure becomes mainstream enough in the UK that I can transition to a Clojure/JVM job some time in the near future.  But for now it's just something I explore in my scant free time.  Sadly.

Here are some driven forces that make Clojure appealing

- interesting people in the community

- innovating clojure products and lib

- good docs, books

- nice functional/lisp combination

 

 

 

 

I'm very happy with the progress Clojure has made to date and I hope that it continues to gain momentum.

type clojure into google trends - it seems to be the only growing language out there.

I am learning but there is more to learn.

I think 4clojure.com could be extended too - this is very helpful.

 

how could I go about contributing to a library one day.

Clojure FTW :D

Part of the reason it's been difficult to use Clojure for scripting tasks is because we've only used the JVM version of Clojure.  And the only problem with using the JVM version is that it's necessary to create a wrapper script in order to create a useful command-line interface.  Clojure.py and clojurec may solve some of those problems.

 

Great survey. It's great that someone takes the time to check the state of things in the Clojure world. I would very much appreciate if you posted the results on r/Clojure on reddit when it becomes available :-)

I love this language!

 

I really hope it succeeds because I want to program in in professionally.

Clojure is Cool!

It is a really elegant language and hope to gain more understanding so I can apply its use to my work rather than just academics..

basically, if i have to jump out of my editor or jump through hoops to use clojure within my java app, then I'm not that interested in its potential benefits.  it's a toy language at that point.  OSGi is a must and still will be post jigsaw release.

Clojure is a blast to work with. I've been prototyping small apps for comparison against Python. I could see myself switching to Clojure completely if there were an efficient way to write command line tools in Clojure.

Clojure has been my first real exposure to LISP and I've become thoroughly enamored with it.  It just feels intuitive and right to me.  I've had a blast working with it and look forward to using it in upcoming projects.

Clojure is lovely and so sweet!

I enjoy a LOT programing in Clojure, except when the answer to a specific problem does not come to my mind as fast as in java, but I expect that to change with the practice.

 

One little concern I have, is that things are moving so fast that is hard to keep actualized with all the progress with all the tools available.

continue the good community work !

I've taken the plunge with clojure i'm all in and would like to attend a conference, next year after a solid year of clojure i'm excited but also hoping  my decision is the correct one, outside of clojure, javascript would have been the language I'd invest my time in.

 

a few things I think are keeping people from clojure

 

1.clarity of what exactly clojure is and the benefits in lawman's terms

 

2.clarity of what libraries do, in most cases I have to do extensive digging in order to get a lightbulb moment about the library

 

example:

 

(Incantar) I didn't know the benefits of this library until one day it just came to me which it's basically a matlab/octave but in clojure then i thought beautiful in a language i'm already studying great with processing grapics.

 

3.I want this language to become mainstream and I realize in order for this to happen we as a community have to allow the implementers to implement doing all the low level clojure stuff, then we need to have middle men who are able to explain low level clojure to average dev. to help them understand how clojure benefits them which is happening but at a scarce rate which sometimes gives me concern about clojure.

 

you've contributed to number 3. with a great book that I've purchased

 

 

my planned domain for clojure is:

 

Interactive audio (programming) overtone

graphics programming quil

web development clojurescript etc....

 

but can't get my head around the benefits of clojurescript.

Clojure is awesome and Rich Hickey is a genius :) I wish there were more jobs where I could develop using Clojure!

I use Clojure mostly as a DSL for generating html in large java systems - it works great. Currently in my free time experimenting with using Clojure as the only language for webdev and i'm more and more fascinated. For me, Clojure is the most exciting language i've seen for many years and i'm definitely willing to use it as my primary language. Thanks for this survey and keep up the good work!

I am utterly in love with Clojure. After having spent close to 7-8 years working with objects, I must admit that Clojure's philosophy came as a revelation to me! I have now completely moved away from OOP and I don't miss it at all...I will definitely look for a Clojure job as soon as I finish my PhD...hopefully there will be plenty by then (fingers crossed!)

I love Clojure and the docs + books are now very good, I'd like to see a similar situation for Clojurescript.

I think that the community is in desperate need of a definitive clojurescript book. Clojurescript has huge potential but needs a authoritative book outlining best practices and examples to rally the community to it. Its very hard to get started and find examples.

GREAT language, GREAT environment, GREAT community.

That's a very enjoyable language to program with. And it makes me feel like a wizard :)

I love Clojure and have learnt a great deal from using it. My one concern about using it production is finding enough people who are also believers. As it's quite a different way of thinking, it could leave us in a tricky spot in the near/medium future... hopefully it will continue to grow! I'll certainly continue to use it and preach to others!

Love the language, love the community, really appreciate all folks are doing to bring Clojure to us.

Love Clojure.

In a way, Clojure has contributed to my isolation, as I must now reach out to find camaraderie outside of Java the Language.  I haven't executed this profound a change in my crowd since I became a parent.  I find I must temper my evangelizing out of kindness and tolerance for one cannot impose epiphany.

Keep going on! Your doing a great job.

Keep going on! Your doing a great job.

BTW, is it possible to convince Maven Central Repository to list Leiningen version string as they do for Buildr, Ivy, Grape, and Scala SBT?

Clojure's a great project. I'm glad to see it used as much as it is on Github.  In a lot of cases where people mention Scala, I like to bring up Clojure as a simpler language to work with.  It's smaller, has less confusing syntaxes (due to not having too many operators or supporting operator overloading) and just pleasant to work with in general.  Leiningen makes working with clojure very nice, and the Emacs plugins are handy too.

Great that this survey is done every year. Interesting to see trends :)

 

Great work!

It's awesome!

I stopped experimenting with Clojure, because Scala appears to be easier to pitch to corporate IT.  Thus, (for now) I've been working on pitching functional programming via Scala to our IT department.

 

Although, Clojure is elogant, the LISP syntax to too great a leap for most Java developers. However, I plan to pursue Clojure in the future, since I am very fond of Clojure.

Clojure and its library ecosystem are not very self-documenting.

 

JVM limitations (particularly adding/reloading external jars) are a source of friction.

 

Error messages are, on the whole, depressingly ugly and unhelpful.

Thank you Clojure for bringing fun back to programming.

Clojure is great, but it seems to be an for geniuses by geniuses. I hope it will be a successful niche language for decades to come!

Love clojure, the community, and this survey.

Stopped using Clojure (before Seesaw) because of the difficulty of integrating Java Swing library.

Clojure is great. And the community is one of the nicest too.

Clojure is great! Thanks!

Thank you for the great work!

I wish the Clojure community would stop treating Clojure like a hobby and throw down the gauntlet with respect to developing web apps like the Rails community. Too much of the old Lisp culture is slipping into the community and there's a lot of talking and not much doing. I live in NYC and see Rich Hickey and all those guys at the Clojure meet-ups looking down from the ivory tower whereas I can go to a Rails meetup and see people developing real apps and getting real projects done.

Clojure is the first language I've used in a long time which has really blown me away, and it's the first language where all necessary compromises have been in perfect accordance with my own opinions. It really has ruined me for any other language!

When you need static typing - chose Haskell.

When you need dynamic typing - chose Clojure.

 

Community is friendly and helpful. Rich Hickey, Stuart Halloway and the rest of clojure/core have set a good tone for the community. Even 'difficult' people on the ML are treated well. You guys should be proud.

Having a great deal of fun!

Thanks for doing the survey

 

General comments?

Thanks for your efforts!

We have been building our business on clojure for over a year and a half. We pretty much have the whole development process sorted for our set of problems. If the language was causing us problems, we would have switched ages ago. We're not afraid of java code, and the inter-op story with clojure is great, so we don't have problems with libraries. We have had a total of 3 bugs that we think would have been caught with a type system, so we don't miss that. The biggest problem we have is that things like datomic make me jealous, but we've written too much code to switch now.

This is random, but so far the conferences are not very compatible with observance of the Jewish sabbath. I'd love to see them shift to not be on Saturdays.

Clojure put the fun back in software development for me at a point where I was disillusioned and close to a career change (even though I started programming when I was 10yrs old). Now I'm programming Clojure 12hrs a day for the tech startup I founded and I absolutely love it.

 

I started working on my software almost two years ago, and every step along the was was confirmation that Clojure was a fantastic tool for the job.

 

The Clojure community is extremely knowledgable, very friendly and helpful, and generally just really awesome - a huge and fundamental difference from the Ruby On Rails and PHP world — RoR and PHP are the Burger King and McDonalds of programming, while Clojure is this fantastic little bistro with a world-class chef that's a well-known secret with the locals.

I wish it had startup time of Go. I really want clojurec to succeed because this means I'll be able to write command line tools in Clojure.

 

Also, I wish CLJS never used Google Closure. I think this is unrealistic wish. :)

Thanks for doing the survey!

cemerick, please do more of your excellent podcast :-)

 

Also, I think that question about targets for ClojureScript should be checkboxes rather than radios.

clojure/core should wake up about asking people to mail pieces of paper and then wait for 2 months even for the tiniest of patches. Even very experienced community members I know do not want to contribute to Clojure because of that "ivory tower" process.

Great community, awesome language, can't wait to see how it will evolve this year (especially interested in typed-clojure lately, I have high hopes for Ambrose's work), and what next platform the language will be facehugging next.

 

Also wondering what will be this years' Rich surprise (we don't hear a lot from him lately, either datomic is taking all his time (I hope for him it is a success really), or he is cooking something awesome.

Clojure rocks!

I haven't yet used Clojure for anything "big" but have found it to be a delight for small projects.

Clojure rocks.

 

Maybe future surveys could ask about meetup/conference participation?

Thank all of the people who have written books, tools, libs, etc.  

Love Clojure and want any excuse to use it!...

I'm happy about the state of Clojure at the moment. There are many practically as well as philosophically good aspects. Also there are many libraries, albeit they are often version 1 and the future will see much better libraries with better abstractions. I'm hoping progress goes on!

cKanren is going to be awesome!

<3

You missed out EuroClojure! That was a great conference. :-)

Thanks for doing this!

I wrote clojure-py, so my using it "in production" is a bit biased. ;-)

Keep up the good work, you guys rock.

Thanks for putting this together.

Clojure is an important language in that it is helping to raise awareness and gain mind-share for the Lisp family.  

Love

Last year at this time I was writing Clojure for work every day. I felt more productive and smarter than I've felt in a long time. The project I was working on ended up getting scrapped and I'm back to Scala for my day-to-day. I keep looking, though, for places to sneak it in and grow it.

I appreciate Clojure, the language, but I also equally appreciate the strong focused message that Rich Hickey and the leaders in the Clojure community are conveying. I don't always get to use Clojure but I always try to apply the principles from Clojure to whatever I am doing.

I'm still a huge Clojure fan and I'm looking for every opportunity to bring it mainstream at work  (large, legacy, java enterprise web application suite)

Clojure is nice, I absolutely love it and will investigate more in it. Would love to see CLJS to be more widespread in use as JS really sucks.

loop/recur makes me a little sad. In general I absolutely love Clojure. I never want to go back to Java (or any language lacking lambdas/closures).

Overall, I love clojure. awesomeness.

Great language, makes programming fun again.

Thanks for doing this for the community.

Clojure is improving at a very rapid rate, and I thoroughly enjoy the language.

it is the first language where I found it easy to get involved in the community; it is also the first that I wanted to get involved.

when saying 'approachable/comprehensive documentation' I'm referring to the quality of the API documentation. Most just give you the bird's level view and in the end you have to read the source yourself to really see what these functions are doing. If we're having to read the source, we can spare with the documentation. This is especially true of clojure's core API, but also many of the former 'contrib' libraries set a low example of documentation. Then again, fixing that is only one patch away...

Clojure is awesome, biggest advantage I get from it is ease of working with data structures and seqs in general, next is FP and immutability - those make code much easier to reason about. I like protocols but rarely find a need for them.

Also IMHO people should be punished for wrapping Hibernate in Clojure, glad it happened so late ;-)

I love Clojure so much, I want to give it a kitten. It's the first language on the JVM that hasn't made me hate life, and the first Lisp I've found myself actually able to use for real-world problems. I love the philosophy of de-complecting features into their own tools. I love eval-ing code from my Emacs buffer into a running process and immediately seeing the changes.

I love Clojure - it helps me think.

Need to find a way to help non-experts understand what Clojure is with minimal overhead of understanding tools ...

Really enjoying the language, and the ways of thinking about things that Clojure and the Clojure community provides.

 

Haven't been exposed to the clojure community much, but from what I have seen, everyone seems helpful, and willing to share their insights.

Thanks!

The conjs are the best conferences I have been to.

Great job on the survey. Glad to see it expanded for "Clojure on platform X."

Clojure is great. I'm However, there seems to be no documentation/tutorials/anything about ClojureScript.

Clojure is really, really cool!

Community needs more people like @cemerick! :)

 

Runtime performance as a frustrating aspect probably more due to my lack of skill in utilizing Clojure efficiently, rather than a problem in Clojure itself.

Please don't let community becomes like those on comp.lang.lisp :D

Enjoying learning the language. Makes a refreshing change from C#/OO.

Excited about ClojureC!

 

Also, you omitted Clojurescript-Lua https://github.com/raph-amiard/clojurescript-lua from the table of Clojure implementations above.

 

Clojure is awesome, the community is full of smart people and Rich Hickey is a source of inspiration. Too bad for that hairstyle...

what percent of these questions  were asked last year? how many are new? Clojure is diverse now, maybe needs specific questions on a per library basis??

go Lisp (in any incarnation)!

thanks for doing this!

really love Clojure so much!!

I am by no means an advanced programmer.  Having the opportunity to participate and learn from programmers like Rich, David Nolen, Fogus, and the Stus (Sierra and Halloway) has been amazing to me.  I have learned more about programming in 3 years than the last 10 (when I have just tinkered).  

 

However, the fleas come with the dog: these advanced programmers sometimes seem like they are leaving some of us behind with the lack of an easy to use IDE that works with both clojure and clojurescript just out of the box.

 

Thanks for this great language! Clojure has made programming FUN.

Love the language; good community too.

I'd love to see more serious work on clojurec! Also, I've REALLY love to see a lang level for Clojure in Dr. Racket, since it is such a nice environment for LISP. Bonus points for getting the REPL working inside it too! I see only one repo on Github tackling this (clojure-racket), and it hasn't been updated in a while, so maybe I'll add onto that.

Good luck getting a fix in to Clojure core if it doesn't affect the Datomic project.

I love all the videos, podcasts, conference talks, etc. about what people are doing with clojure and the community looks awesome. Those things are what motivated me to learn clojure and have made the process so enjoyable.

Clojure has come further than I could have hoped for in the past few years, and I'm thrilled to see where it goes next.

I would personally like to thank Rich Hickey for introducing me to the fantastic world/possibilities of functional programming and the broader Lisp paradigm.

 

The introduction of Lisp (specifically Clojure) into my daily work has been a fantastic intellectual/productivity boon. I now frame problems in entirely new, functional ways.

 

If I could go back and do it again, I would probably skip over OOP, Java, C++, C# and kin, and go straight to functional programming!

Thanks!

Clojure is great, however the slow pace of development really kills community motivation for core contributions.

I always wanted to learn a lisp, and  Clojure made it possible. #awesome

still going strong!

I love Clojure for the way it changes your coding-style through immutability. I love the development-process with SLIME in emacs, a repl is not enough for me, after going back to python I am totally bugged by not having SLIME. The quality of most libraries is really good. I am sure that everybody who got to a certain point in Clojure will stick to it, but it is a hard sell in companies that are keen on python because every beginner falls into a trap of class path issues and import when playing around after a while.

I LIEK CHOCOLATE MILK!

1. There should be a similar survey for Leiningen, which is arguably the first killer app of Clojure.

2. This survey is a fantastic way to collect and disseminate information about the Clojure eco-system.

3. I would be happy to contribute what I can to any efforts to address the issues I listed "Clojure's most glaring weakness...". I hope knowledgable people will pave the way for the likes of me.

soooooo excited about the conj

Chas thx for this wonderful effort.

Thanks for being a part of the awesome!

I really wish there was an official clojure-in-clojure interpreter I could study.

I love clojure, it's the first lisp I've really hooked onto but it's still not really suitable for use at my workplace so for the time being I'm just a fair weather friend.

Clarify that the jvm target is a minimum :)

Overtone got me serious about grokking the Clojure world about a week after I started playing with it from within Emacs. If those illusive Clojure stickers ever materialize, I want one for my Sennheiser headphones.

 

We do a lot of data processing (not "Big Data", just "lots of data") with the core parts in Java and the glue layers in Python. This week, I had a need to write an inline filter...er...mangler, and instead of doing it in Python like the rest, took a day and did it in Clojure. Man, it was a joy to build, and it snuck into our pre-production environment as an (uber)JAR without anyone noticing. Snappy, simple, and fun.

 

High five.

I have no real excuse for not having sent in a CA, but it seems like a pretty high bar for preventing *any* participation in core language development.  I can't even subscribe to the dev mailing list without having sent in a CA!  I (mostly) understand the desire to control code that way, but perhaps external resources like the mailing list, wiki, and even the website could be opened to accept patches from a wider range of sources.

Clojure looks really promising and your book is pure awesomness!

I haven't used Clojure as much as I'd like because it's not officially approved at the bank where I work. My outside work has focused on JRuby, although maybe I need to dedicate myself to a Clojure project.

In general, I've found Clojure modern, palatable and inspiring (much more so than older Lisp dialects). I wish for it to have a bright future, and for it to become a "data glue" language on many hosting platforms (e.g. clojure-py, native, the CLR).

A well thought out reference example project (or two or three) would facilitate more people adopting clojure, or at least make it easier for newbies to "get it".

its cool, keep up the good work. i hope i will use it in production some day with it elegant syntax ;)

Hope you keep contributing Chas - your various efforts are really appreciated.

The Clojure Programming book is awesome - enough detail that I have renewed hope that I can achieve Clojure enlightenment in this lifetime or the next...

 

There is a huge need to explain to people further what thinking functionally really means in practice.  Function composition ala F(G(X)) like in Algebra and higher order math is one way of describing it, but there needs to be a strong book or books and articles also that address what it is to build a system with bottom up and top down programming in the traditional Lisp way, but also stressing that functions and their ability to be composed comes from the understanding of levels of data and functions applied to that data being built up.  That keeping functions pure and side-affect free gives the ability to compose more easily.  These things all must be shown in much better clarity and at a level that is not just CS friendly.  It needs to be "everyman" friendly.  Everyman should be able to get the power and freedom provided by this approach and the programming world will be better for it.

 

Much in the same way programmers learned that everything isn't an Object, but some things are just data. We want every programmer whether they are at a level of using Basic, PHP or some other language that doesn't provide the high-order ideas that Lisp allows to be availed of the power. To do that doesn't mean bringing their languages up by patching on, but by bringing more clarity, more examples aimed at that group, more samples, etc. that really clarify and educate them up to the level of expecting that the power we have in Lisp is the power they should expect of all languages, all tools, etc.

 

Anyway, enough of my rant. If you need more feel free to contact me at: staypufd@mac.com or at sam.griffith@interactivewebsystems.com

 

Thanks for doing this survey. I am hopeful that Clojure will lead us back to the great things and great joy programming was when I did Smalltalk and Lisp (on Lisp Machines)

Great community

My cat's breath smells like cat food.

nice survey!

I'd like to see some REPL commands that help ease tedious things. I program frequently in Haskell using GHCi and have the ability to do things like reload files without having to write a bunch of code.

I ticked "Runtime performance" as both a win and a possible impediment for using Clojure in more places. Having previously used Python as my preferred language for exploratory programming and non-performance-critical parts, Clojure has almost completely replaced Python in that area and the performance win is big. I work on a commercial product primarily implemented in Java and am gradually replacing parts of it with Clojure. What I am unsure about at this point is whether I will be able to go all the way with Clojure instead of Java wrt performance. But here's hoping, because the domain (roughly NLP/IR) is well suited in my opinion :)

Love Clojure, keep up the good work.

Great for art, research, and having fun.

Thanks for doing the survey Chas!

I love Clojure. It makes programming fun!

I am about half-way through Clojure Programming and have found it to be an excelling programming language book in general.  It has helped me really grasp the fundamental philosophies, techniques and capabilities of the language.

Great survey except for two things: hard to pick the biggest wins, and hard to pick any from the most frustrating things list:).

 

Thanks for the survey and for the great work you are doing for the community!

 

It's funny that I've criticize some of the stuff in my own blog as well .. and now I feel that somebody is actually listening.

Still, I like Clojure a lot.

awesome!

Clojure is really exciting!

Thanks for doing this and thanks for all your quality contributions to the community!

Thanks for doing this.

Its made me a better programmer more than anything else Ive done over the last 15 years.

I love clojure.

 

It has a great community, very professional.

thx 4 super awesome survey

It is a pleasure.

I've done enough of these Clojure surveys now to know that the above paragraphs aren't what you want to hear, will never be counted as a summarized sentiment people in the community have, might hurt feelings etc. I guess I'm the only one that says this stuff into the survey, cuz I know a lot of guys say it to me.

 

So, you probably wanted something more like, yeah, boy, a compiler that just dumps its own stack trace when there's a flaw in the code it tries to compile. We should fix that. But keep up the great work, Clojure is the best!

The two things I need to write code for most often are web dev and automating sys admin tasks. Unfortunately clojure takes far too long to start to really use for CLI apps (keeping a close eye on clojurec for that!) and my experience with getting clojure running on a web server so far is that it uses up far too much RAM to fit into my current environment for my hobby projects.

I was drawn to Clojure by Rich Hickey's philosophy on functional programming, immutability, time, complexity, etc. I'm still not convinced Clojure's syntax is the way of the future (I prefer Haskell's syntax for example) but I think the philosophy behind Clojure is unbeatable.

I'm interested to see how the progression of Light Table changes the clojure landscape. It seems to have a lot of buzz around it from outside the clojure community and it is different from anything else out there. I think there are still a lot of ways it could fail but it will be fun to watch.

I love it. It's like to be back home, back to basics.

I think that the Clojure web site needs a serious overhaul. It's simple, it's easy, it's pragmatic, but it's not "selling" Clojure. That Clojure is a better Java than Java, for example, is not spelled out on the Clojure home page. This is an essential selling point for Clojure in the "enterprise" Java space.

 

I propose that we create a Kickstarter project to fund a complete overhaul of the Clojure web site by people with the right expertise for the job. I'm sure everyone in the community with ambitions to use Clojure as something more than a boutique hobby language will be more than happy to contribute. I'll pledge US$200 myself if something like this gets going. It's in my own self-interest after all! - Paul Dorman (paul.dorman@gmail.com).

Cheers for an eventually much more useful Clojars.

Thanks for ClojureDocs. Cheers for an eventually more useful ClojureDocs.

Overall, Clojure has been a huge win for us, providing dramatic performance and robustness improvements, as well as allowing us to grow an easily maintainable and flexible code base.

Awesome that ClojureScript and Datomic came out this year. I worry that there's too much surface area for any one person, even the benevolent hammock resident, to focus on.

 

I'm bummed that according to Github Clojure's ranking went from 17th to 23rd most popular – Scala is now ahead.

 

It's good that Relevance is expanding their training efforts.

 

I wish I could keep up with the Clojure Google groups.

 

Love seeing David Nolen and Ambrose Bierce be positive, effective figures on Twitter. Keep doing neat things!

 

I'm not sure why but I'm definitely more interested in Clojure/West than the Conj. I could easily go to both, but probably only the former. Alex knows how to hold a great conference.

 

I worry that Relevance seems to be losing more people than they are gaining. A lot of big names left this year. They are also not advertising on lispjobs.wordpress and not at my local Clojure meetup.

I love it. Programming became fun again like it was 15 years ago.

Good survey

I'm a beginner who's still trying to wrap his head around Clojure. I'm loving it so far. Feel free to email me@isaac.su or tweet @isaacsu

Sometimes the toolchain seems really brittle, it's less of a problem than with other languages but it would be a nice thing to say that isn't a problem with Clojure.

I find the Clojure mailing list to show a user base that is mostly ignorant of other Lisp dialects, which is a shame, as there is a lot of wisdom from, say, comp.lang.lisp that's absent, and we see people fumbling over problems solved long ago, making it seem as though we just keep starting over every few years in computer programming.

Chas, you need to come out of the closet about Emacs.

Everyone knows you're using it in secret, you can admit it now.

Come on.

 

 

My latest frustration has been leiningens version change. Some things require version 2 and some require version 1.

Once that you've made some progress on learning the very basics, there's a TON of materials scattered around the web, most of it is great quality stuff, including videos from conferences and such.

I love Clojure. It still seems very young and there are many active languages out there. To me (and many in the community) it seems that it's the future but I don't really know if we'll be able to win enough mindshare to be anything other than a niche language.

Really fun

Love learning such a powerful language. Also like how smart the community around it seems to be. Thanks all

Clojure/core is very quiet.

Thanks for doing the survey, Chas!

Continue your great work, Iv bought the book looking forward to future work

Still would love to see more clojure-in-clojure work. Easy interface to C libraries is why python is so popular in the numerical computing area and a similarly easy to interface C/LLVM clojure runtime would be very nice.

I only use Clojure because Datomic is really cool!

Although I'm still very new with Clojure, I think it's a great language.

 

I would like to see an implementation in Objective C (specifically for iOS).

Clojure is the best thing that has happened to programming in the last 25 years.

Clojure rocks!

i wish all languages had a leiningen

Thanks clojure,thank you.I  love clojure!

I wish there was a Lua equivalent for Clojure, easily embeddable but with all the bells and whistles. Compiling to C is not quite the same.

Same as all other languages: non-apparent dependency relationships on package, namespace and function level (even worse than in e.g. Java where you have at least some analysis tools and Dependency structure matrix) and manual management of modularity. This often leads to "Big Ball Of Mud" implementations, as there is no awareness (lack of visibility) and/or time to manually clean things up. On one side Clojure would have a bonus here as due to lack of implicit OO it has a much simpler baseline (just namespaces and functions) than e.g. Java, OTOH lack of static typing makes analysis tougher.

I can't over emphasize how difficult this is coming from my rudimentary/next-to-know-nothing condition.

 

I've had to learn/am-still trying to learn what is the best linux distro that will enable me to best obtain the foundations for my project? (jdk 7 postgres 9 emacs 24 leiningen 2) I'm trying debian and it's giving me headaches. I would pay hard cash for a dummies like book for getting into clojure, not just learning the language, but getting it to where I have a working environment where I can start building a datomic schema and clojure powered web app.

 

I know Rich Hickey talks about the difference between easy and simple. I don't want easy, but it would be nice if it got taken a notch down from insanely difficult.

Keep going. :)

It's good to see Clojure gaining popularity. I've been to conferences aimed at architects, C# devs, Java devs, and Clojure always seems to come up in conversation, always with positive feedback. It takes a good solid approach.

I love it... each time I use it I am excited about it.

Love the ideas involved. Concerned about the tools and debugging.

 

In practice I find it very hard to actually write Clojure code. A line of Clojure takes me around 10-20 times longer to write than a line of Python. I'm trying to write a game and I've bogged down to almost no progress because it seems so difficult.

I suspect lightable instarepl should be included in this year survey :)

i like Clojure! :)

I think Clojure is a very exciting and promising language. I'm looking forward to it's future. I really hope that someday it will become a mainstream language like Python or Java these days.

Really like it, having been a Schemer in uni years ago.  Really great for solving little puzzle problems and project Euler problems

Clojure is awesome :-)   I wish I had more time to learn to master it.

The first question on how long you have used clojure should include the option intermitently. Most people I know use it this way. Last survey I felt clojure was a bit too uninterested in the needs/wants of the "average" programmer but I think they've improved on that a bit. Clojure-contrib being broken up was the best idea of the past year (or 2). Leiningin and cake merging to give us leiningin version 2 means I now spen most of my (little) clojure time in the command line (n)REPL. I think more work needs to be done towards standardizing libraries i.e. documenting, searching, e.t.c. I don't find clojars terribly useful except for I know leiningin downloads jars from there. All in all I think it's going from strengt-to-strength but now needs to focus on the "average" folk :)

 

 

I love Clojure, it has made development interesting and challenging again. Thanks Rich.

 

My two pieces of advice:

# Just get stuck in, don't be afraid to feel stupid.

# Go to a conference. You will meet some very smart people, but also people just like yourself trying to learn how best to use Clojure.

Thank you for doing this survey. It helps the Clojure community to reflect and deduce steps necessary to take for a successful future of Clojure based on these reflections.

Also I'm really enjoying reading your Clojure book!

Happy to participate in the survey as I am learning Clojure and would like to build some useful applications. So, would like to know overall outcome of the survey for my future directions.

I am very grateful for Clojure, it has made me a much better developer.

 

Many thanks to everyone involved.

<3 Clojure (and the survey.. as you fished for it!)

Clojure is an eye opening experience if you get the chance to learn it. Its high level models and approach to programming are both inspiring and useful. Never having used a Lisp before, it truly delivered Eric Raymond's promise of making me a better programmer for (up until now, at least) the rest of my life.

Let's help Phil get swank-clojure back on track wrt. following slime development.

I wish ClojureScript became easier to install and use in web app projects. ClojureScript One does a good job, but it covers only a few aspects of web app development.

I have chosen Java for 2 specific projects that are now in production even though Clojure would have cut development time in half, because there is no chance anyone in the company but me would be able to support it.

enjoy programming with clojure, had stopped programming for a while

It's amazing to see how Rich and the whole Clojure core team managed to create such a wonderful JVM based Lisp dialect. And equally amazing to see how many people have started coding Clojure around the globe.

I'm a happy Clojure user! Looking forward to all the cool stuff that is coming!

 

About this survey, I think one missing in category of the biggest wins of Clojure is, is that the language is so extensible that one can build stuff like core.logic into the language. It might not be production-ready now, but it is the stuff that makes me really excited!

Clojure is an excellent language that makes a lot of sense to me. If there is something I need to do, it solution lies either in the core language or in a library like clojure-csv. I think better IDE environments that are easy to set up would be helpful. Compared to Scala, Clojure is a an uncomplicated language. Clojure-ites should talk that up more. I don't know scala, but have been trying to learn the syntax just to see what all the hub-bub is about.

 

It is still too hard to set up a development environment, though setting up lein is a lot nicer than setting up vimclojure.

 

The Clojure community for the most part is a good group of people, and they have been very helpful, as I have been trying to learn the language.

Thanks for doing this and for all the work you do for the Clojure community.

I love love love clojure.  How to convince my coworkers???

I'd love to see a 5 minute pre-recorded video by some industry luminary (Neal Ford or someone like that) talk directly to managers about why they should adopt clojure.  I'm thinking of something like when some movie star tells kids not to smoke or something, except longer and about clojure.  Then we can sit our managers down Clockwork Orange style and have them watch it.  5 minutes may not be much time, but my manager's attention span before ignoring things is probably less than that anyway.

 

To expand the idea even further, such a video could eventually be part of a "Clojure adoption toolkit for imprisoned developers". It could also include things like 1-page colorful charts and short quotes for managers to cling to and regurgitate when talking to their "superiors".

How much has work on Datomic taken momentum from Clojure?  I'm not sure, but I do wonder.

Great community, great language, really great books (I have read them all).  It would be nice if we could use this on iPhones/iPad's without jumping through hoops, but that may come over time.   I'd like to see minnow and clooj come together into a strong IDE, but maybe light table will overtake that effort.

Still learning, but I love the cohesive feel of the language. It doesn't seem like arbitrary, unnecessary features are added without justification.

Love Clojure! If only I could make my employees share my entusiasm... :-)

None.

The community is absolutely awesome.

I prefer more approachable languages like Haskell, Go, or even C.

I'm a total noob when it comes to Clojure, I come from a Python background and I'm currently involved in Java projects. I think it would be cool to learn some more about Clojure and how it can play with Hadoop (I work at Cloudera).

 

So far it's been a really cool experience!!

It's usually chilly in the morning in San Francisco, which means I need to bring a jacket to work, even in August.

Clojure is a wonderful programming language and I've truly enjoyed learning and using it! Keep up the good work!

Would have been good to include a question about the best books on clojure. There are many good ones, would have been interesting to see what folks like the most.

I wish Clojure could be compiled down to binaries. clojurec may solve that problem.

I read stuart halloway's book and after about 3/4 of it the only thought I had was "I should be using clojure for everything." It has changed the way I think about software development.

I'm examining Clojure, but I am very unhappy that it doesn't have an easy way to draw on extant Common Lisp code (or vice versa).

 

I like the idea of Lisp/JVM interop, but I have a notion that ABCL is a better software system to use, despite the Clojure community and momentum.

 

Also, it's a Lisp-1, ew.

Quite comprehensive and very nice.

Thanks for doing the survey!

Clojurescript is the shit

Thank you!

Thanks for doing it!

there is no way to get a mentor

I love the language and I love the amount of platforms it targets; it really feels like Clojure is a trusty tool in my belt that I can use no matter what the job. I've also found it is a great entry into functional languages for me. I have tried Haskell and Erlang and neither have taught me the functional concepts as quickly or easily as playing with Clojure has. Recursion actually feels easy now :D.

Clojure rocks. Period.

I still enjoy using it for my little projects, but still haven't been successful getting any adoption within my workplace.

You should ask people what their favorite Clojure books are.  I liked yours very much.

The thing about type safety is going to cause me to use Haskell in anger.

Still working on reading through the manuscript of your book that you sent me so that I can write a review of it.  (If you ignore the blog post drafts that are already fully written and ready to be posted,) that will be the next post I work on and publish.  Thanks!

 

-- Elango

Chas is the wind beneath my wings

I have used Clojure almost enough to be productive in it. At some point I expect to feel informed enough about deciding if its worth the additional trouble or not for using it over Java... Low level productivity, it seems like it. Higher level stuff? Don't know yet.

Clojure is absolutely and insanely great. I love it. Thank you Master Hickey !!!

 

I find that hype about ClojureScript strange: It is of course tempting to leverage

JavaScript's range, as every Browser speeks it. But: JavaScript is as beautiful

as Clojure. And anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't understand JavaScript.

And Browser incompatibilities aren't a problem anymore with all the high end normalizers

available these days. Futhermore, it attracts the wrong people.

That energy should be spend otherwise.

 

I find the energy put into attracting newbies very strange.

Lisps will never ever rule the world. Probably for the same

reason, that most people will never ever be attracted to Algebra.

That energy should be spend otherwise.

 

I would *very* much like Clojure on C. That would kick common lisp's old venerable ass !

A lot of energy should be spend there.

I do like that ClojureScript was mentioned in the survey, and I have great hope for its future development. I haven't actually used clojurescript for any production code yet primarily because without the advanced compilation option I feel that the javascript files generated for even very small programs are unacceptably large, and with advanced compilation for its dead code removal it becomes a nightmare to debug.

I wanted another option between "Investigating" and "No plans to investigate" for the different runtime options, a la "I hope to look into this at some point"; I put "I've never heard of it" instead for those.

 

Discoverability continues to be a challenge for me, but I think that's mostly because I haven't made the time to go exploring.

 

I'd like to see more Documentation on things like Leiningen, ClojureScript, and Overtone, but maybe they're out there and I just haven't found them yet. Most of what I have come across seems pretty fragmented and with the rapidly changing landscape of some of these tools it is hard to tell what is still relevant and what has been superceded--part of this is because a lot of what I find is old blog posts by someone who was trying to do something and decided to share it with the world. (For example, I worked through Chris Granger's little web-based controller for Overtone about a week ago and had to do a few things significantly differently than he did). That having been said I do realize, especially with the blog posts, there's really nothing that can be done unless the authors of said posts decide to start maintaining them and upgrading them to work with the latest versions of stuff (psssh, who has time for that?!). Perhaps this is all a necessary side-effect of such rapid growth. Furthermore, I absolutely LOVE the ClojureDocs.org site; I wish more of the libraries had similar repositories of knowledge and especially examples!

 

Thanks for all of your work with the language and helping spread it; overall I think it is fantastic and I look forward to using it more and more in the future.

Other points of clojurey pain:

* slowness of most scripting/command-line tools

* absolutely dreadful error reporting in core and in command-line tools (eg leiningen will sooner throw 5 pages of traceback than any useful and actionable error)

* difficulty of finding not only libraries but the "right" version of a library, especially as clojure does not allow specifying "get the latest" during e.g. development (fixing a version is sensible for production, but just annoying when playing around)

 

Makes it much harder to seriously give a shot at clojure when coming from a good ecosystem (Ruby, Python, Perl, ...)

So far Clojure has been a breath of fresh air coming from C/C++/Python. I find that I'm using it more and more and in the next year should have much more to say about it.

thanks for doing this, and thanks for your book + nrepl + other contributions to the community

I'm still probing Clojure for weaknesses, but so far Clojure has had way fewer frustrating bits than Ruby or Python.  Its java interop has been a huge part of its appeal.  A judicious application of macros in combination with use of java's reflection APIs has made working with existing java codebases not quite pleasant, but bearable.

 

One bit that I don't quite like is how the quasiquote operation appears to get expanded at the reader layer, making it impossible to do (read-string "'`(foo ~(rand))"), i.e. to do a quoted quasiquotation - the returned form will instead be a bunch of sequence manipulation operations. This is something that I feel Scheme gets right, and which no other lisp seems to - `(foo bar) in scheme is entirely equivalent to (backquote (foo bar)), which allows localized hacking of the backquote operator within a lexical context, among other things. It's not a huge problem, which is why I didn't put it under glaring weaknesses/blind spots, but it does bother me a bit.

clojure is cool :D

Clojure is neat. I like potato salad with dill pickles.

Still an awesome language, nothing has changed about that. :)

I love that you do this survey every year. On behalf of the Clojure community.. Thank You!

I love clojure. I am trying to promote at my work place. But I fail to defend using it. It would be helpful if some authority on clojure lists out it strengths and weakness.

It's really great to work with a lisp on the JVM. Wouldn't mind seeing more Java interop stuff left by the wayside.  Would really like to see a Clojure/core that compares with Java's standard library.

Clojure's nice. It's brought the fun back to programming for me!

I love that I can keep most of the core language in my head while I'm working on stuff.  

 

Once I get clojure code working, it works very well indeed; I replaced a production python tornado service with clojure, and it went from always having problems/going down, to something that is rock solid, has never crashed, and is highly stable in the system resources it uses.

 

The Clojurescript compilation process and how to integrate with existing javascript code has been a continuing pain point for me. The appropriate place to split code between ClojureScript and javascript is a subtle and difficult problem, from my perspective.

Learning Clojure and being a part of the community has enriched my life in many ways.  I just hope it keeps expanding in interesting directions so I can keep learning new things and meeting new people.

I think you're doing great work pushing the community forward. Thanks for your efforts.

I fully believe clojure is at the forefront of the new generation of languages, and I'm excited to see it push forward the standards for other languages.

Clojure is an absolute joy for me to work in, even in spite of a few weaknesses in tooling and environment support (which have definitely been decreasing!).

I like Clojure and feel like it can much more then Ruby for handling complex business logic.

I also glanced over your book and it looks very promising, thank you for your commitment into this very interest language.

CLJS interpreter!

Its a great language. With more free time I'd like to use it in any project I possibly can.

REPLs rock.  ;-)

STICKERS!  You should provide a way to get clojure stickers online!

Clojure.org isn't very nice compared to clojure.com or even clojuredocs.  

You did a really good job with your book.  Thanks.

Clojure is my favorite coding community (not that I really participate) and I'm looking forward to watching the mindshare grow.

* survey: It would have been cool to have "using data instead of Domain classes" as an entry for "What have been the biggest wins for you in using Clojure?"

 

* Initiatives like "clojure Atlas" are great and should be more "marketed"(?), this is very beginner friendly (and also great for exprienced Clojurian). And it's not even on the front page of clojure.org (same for clojuredocs.org)

 

* Thank you :) For gathering informations which may help improving Clojure's success (and thank you too for clojureatlas, I am using it all the time, I should pay for it, oops, will do ASAP)

 

* I am a poor Java developer "I would do Clojure for food" So if you search for Clojure devs working remotely, I am available :)

Thanks to RH.

It's a lovely language.

Great book, thanks.

Clojure is the only programming language I enjoy using today. Wonderfully done, everyone.

I hope the Clojure core team will continue to focus on practicality, user-friendliness, and on reducing the cognitive load a programmer has to deal with.

I am voting for neither candidate in the US national election because neither has sufficiently conveyed to me his support for future success of Clojure.

Thanks for doing this!

great survey, looking forward to the results.

Missing question: "Do you like the direction Clojure's going in?"  - Yes! :)

Thanks for taking the time to maintain it.

 

Major Clojure projects like leiningen, incanter, quil, overtone should be allowed to register as clojure.org subdomains,

 

eg.

 

leiningen.clojure.org

incanter.clojure.org

 

rather than have to pay for their own domains elsewhere.

It's easier to write java in Clojure than it is to write java in java.

Great community :)

Just forgot to mention Eclipse + ccw in the last submission!

Let's hope some of the issues get fixed as it's an amazing community and language!

Really pleased with clojure.  As IDE's improve and new platforms are targeted I'll use it more.  

Seems like there are four or five copies of dead libs on clojars, for a variety of github accounts. Hard to determine which is canonical; I wish our community were better at handing off/coalescing dead projects. Error messages and stack traces are incomprehensible, especially from the compiler.

I like Clojure a lot.

I love the ideas, and Clojure's gotten me into LISP in general. I'd like it to have more the feel of a scripting language as far as development goes (not the core language).

I haven't seen any new episodes of Mostly Lazy lately; I really enjoy those!  Thank you for putting them together!

 

(gen-class ...) can it be done without AOT compilation?

 

Oh, one more: the old contrib had a really great function called fmap for performing a (map ...) on the elements of a hash-map and keeping the outputs keyed to the same values in an output hash-map. Where did that go?

 

Thank you for putting this survey together!

Clojure is great!

 

I am a Java Developer. I am used to building Classes and UML type hierarchies.

I am used to laying out an architecture, something fixed and static.

Clojure/lisp seems to be a different kind of beast. Instead of laying out classes for screens, it seems I should be putting together data structures that represent screens. And then use Functions/Macro's to create data that can be pipe-lined into something like seesaw and have it generate a screen on-the-fly. Or with Macro's at compile time.

 

I end up with screens but without hard-coded panels/jFrames with hard-coded fields.

 

So, I think that working in a functional environment/lisp provides me with a faster simpler, boiler-plate free environment built on data.

Idiomatic Clojure was the hardest thing to learn. Joy of Clojure was the first time I felt it was really presented.

Docs don't explain why anything would be used, nor which other functions you'll use something with. Protocol docs were completely misleading. Need a good library of books to have references for common stuff (eg. Practical Clojure for protocols & deftype, Joy of Clojure to see that a protocol gets extended to Object to implement toString).

Feel like I needed to know almost as much as everyone in the community in order to discuss with them.

Lack of types in complex structures can lead to runtime bugs that a type system would trivially avoid.

Command-line compiling seems unnecessarily complex.

I don't want to program in any other language, but sometimes it's hard when things don't seem to make sense.

Thanks for this survey, it allowed me to put some thought into what I'm looking for in Clojure.

Incredibly smart and helpful community and my favorite language.  

I <3 Chas.

Chas, Thanks for putting together the survey.

 

Clojure/core - don't take it personally. People are only aggro because they love Clojure and the work that's been done. The whole... with great power comes great responsibility.

 

Clojure community, you guys are insanely awesome.

 

Other people external to the Clojure/Core are doing Clojure in Clojure and Clojure in C. What's happening with Clojure/Core and CinC? Is this dead?

The IDE issue is improving, CCW is heading in the right direction, e.g. usable auto-complete

I really enjoy developing clojure and would love to do it all day.

I'd like to hear more from Rich Hickey and the other main guys about what they are doing or have in mind for future releases.

 

Unless you're in that dev-circle, you're completely in the dark regarding Clojure's future.

 

I'd like to hear more both to satisfy my curiosity and to assure myself and the community that Clojure actually has a future and is not becoming abandonware little by little.

 

Beginning to _love_ Clojure! :-)

<3 Clojure.

+1 for the survey. Like last time, very good idea.

 

Clojure is :

- great

- multi-paradigm

- made me a better developer in my 'pseudo' primary one.

- is now my language and it's really my first in which i truly engage.

 

Great ideas tend to take a long time to be adopted.

Not so long ago, GNU/Linux was laughed at. Now it's not.

 

Do not despair, just wait.

It's time.

 

clojure as modern variant of lisp is fun

"All your Maven repositories belong to us."

Clojure is the greatest thing that happened to me in life. It restored to me the joy of programming.

thanks to everyone

When I first learned Ruby in 2001, I really wanted it to win, but I found the lack of open source libraries and tooling too much to overcome, and eventually found myself back in Java-land.  In hindsight, I wish I rolled up my sleeves and contributed rather than complained, but I still had projects to complete and work to do, and the practicalities may have prevented this anyway.  Clojure is at a point where a few key improvements could help it really take off tremendously.  Now I use it as much as possible, but occasionally find myself reluctantly switching back to Java or other tools to get a project done due to some rough edges.  I love this language and it has taught me a lot.  I would like to see the tooling and information organization surpass that of Java.

It needs big vendor support or it will always be very difficult for me to convince management or peers at work to use it.

I actually ended up going back to Common Lisp, the performance issues on the JVM (especially startup times, but not solely) were unacceptable.

Love Clojure, if only the Eclipse and IntelliJ plugins were good enough to convince others, I'm sure it has improved by now, the last time I used them, the counterclockwise plugin would just error out and the IntelliJ plugin is too rudimentary.

Really love the community.  They're smart, friendly, and helpful.

I think Clojure is confronted with the dilemma of whether it wants to be elitist (in a good way), take over the world or find a way to do both.

In general, I think Clojure is awesome. Thanks for doing the survey again!

Cojure would be more awesome with the Actor model instead of STM.

I like the survey, keep on the good work! I hope that for the next year's survey I can fill-in more insightful answers and perhaps even show some further community involvement from my part... Things are looking good for Clojure and me. Studying the language and its features has been very refreshing and thought provoking for me. I hope to get my hands dirty with a "serious" hobby project quite soon in the near future.

Clojure is incredible and the community is also.  There is so much potential, but people are busy using Clojure for their own needs and there hasn't been much in the way of "PR".

 

Thanks so much for managing this survey!

A new language gives people a fresh start and fresh hope. Although that may not be the intention of the creator or the community, I feel there is a kind of "hype" going on. That hype blinds certain people from seeing the weakness, and turns away some people who feel they have been cheated. I feel Clojure has good potential because it chose JVM as its launch pad, and actually instroduced some novel useful features in addition to the original LISP goodness, but I would not say it is a great language yet. I hope more people can realize that so it eventually can be great.

Apart from "Clojure is Awesome", you mean? :) I'm grateful that I'm getting to work with this language and platform at this moment :)

Thanks.

Clojure rocks, and the community is generally *extremely* helpful and supportive.  It is the only language I've used where clarity, concision, and performance don't work at cross purposes.

This is very helpful to the community, thank you!

 

Clojure community and the projects that come out of it are amazing, and one of the main thing that keeps me interested in the language.

 

Feedback on the patches I've submitted in Jira would encourage me to contribute to Clojure more.

Thanks for making this survey! You rule.

love clojure and the community of cool&clever people

theres lots iof exciting projects like incanter, overtone,reimann, storm, datomic, lighttable etc

Thanks Clojure, programming is fun again!

[And thanks Chas for running this survey ;]

Clojure is the language I most enjoy programming in. I look forward to seeing what improvements come next!

cool lang! I love it.

As a community we need to do a better job of collaborating and pushing patches up to library maintainers.  Otherwise we are left with "github forks gone wild" resulting in millions of orphaned libraries.

 

Keep it up!

The clojure cheat sheet is great

Very happy with literature (books and online docs, especially clojuredocs.org) and libraries. Great to see everyone converged on lein. Recent improvements to repl (lein2, nrepl, reply) have been great. I like to see efforts like IClojure to get the repl closer to capabilities or R, IPython, and Pry. Still a little ways to go, colors (and maybe some shortcuts) being the last obvious needed improvements. Nice to see new user groups popping up. Recently joined a Portland, OR group.

 

I was attracted to clojure 6 months ago by the "7 Languages in 7 Weeks" book. We need more language comparisons like that to make obvious why clojure is the obvious choice.

Looking forward to playing with LightTable some more.

still a great language, keep it up

Loved lisp dialect and Clojure running on the JVM made my bet to do my thesis, but I'm stuck about how to proceed with this language. I guess I need to program more solely in Clojure to come up with a veredict.

Very nice community (now even with a european conference :-)

Still very happy to have found a functional language that integrates with my day job duties better than Haskell does...

Really like the pragmatic approach to language design

Btw.: thanks for your excellent book. Still helps a lot, currently exploring Ring and Enlive.

I am really a dynamic languages guy professionally, particularly Python.  In my dream world, Clojure becomes mainstream enough in the UK that I can transition to a Clojure/JVM job some time in the near future.  But for now it's just something I explore in my scant free time.  Sadly.

Here are some driven forces that make Clojure appealing

- interesting people in the community

- innovating clojure products and lib

- good docs, books

- nice functional/lisp combination

 

 

 

 

I'm very happy with the progress Clojure has made to date and I hope that it continues to gain momentum.

type clojure into google trends - it seems to be the only growing language out there.

I am learning but there is more to learn.

I think 4clojure.com could be extended too - this is very helpful.

 

how could I go about contributing to a library one day.

Clojure FTW :D

Part of the reason it's been difficult to use Clojure for scripting tasks is because we've only used the JVM version of Clojure.  And the only problem with using the JVM version is that it's necessary to create a wrapper script in order to create a useful command-line interface.  Clojure.py and clojurec may solve some of those problems.

 

Great survey. It's great that someone takes the time to check the state of things in the Clojure world. I would very much appreciate if you posted the results on r/Clojure on reddit when it becomes available :-)

I love this language!

 

I really hope it succeeds because I want to program in in professionally.

Clojure is Cool!

It is a really elegant language and hope to gain more understanding so I can apply its use to my work rather than just academics..

basically, if i have to jump out of my editor or jump through hoops to use clojure within my java app, then I'm not that interested in its potential benefits.  it's a toy language at that point.  OSGi is a must and still will be post jigsaw release.

Clojure is a blast to work with. I've been prototyping small apps for comparison against Python. I could see myself switching to Clojure completely if there were an efficient way to write command line tools in Clojure.

Clojure has been my first real exposure to LISP and I've become thoroughly enamored with it.  It just feels intuitive and right to me.  I've had a blast working with it and look forward to using it in upcoming projects.

Clojure is lovely and so sweet!

I enjoy a LOT programing in Clojure, except when the answer to a specific problem does not come to my mind as fast as in java, but I expect that to change with the practice.

 

One little concern I have, is that things are moving so fast that is hard to keep actualized with all the progress with all the tools available.

continue the good community work !

I've taken the plunge with clojure i'm all in and would like to attend a conference, next year after a solid year of clojure i'm excited but also hoping  my decision is the correct one, outside of clojure, javascript would have been the language I'd invest my time in.

 

a few things I think are keeping people from clojure

 

1.clarity of what exactly clojure is and the benefits in lawman's terms

 

2.clarity of what libraries do, in most cases I have to do extensive digging in order to get a lightbulb moment about the library

 

example:

 

(Incantar) I didn't know the benefits of this library until one day it just came to me which it's basically a matlab/octave but in clojure then i thought beautiful in a language i'm already studying great with processing grapics.

 

3.I want this language to become mainstream and I realize in order for this to happen we as a community have to allow the implementers to implement doing all the low level clojure stuff, then we need to have middle men who are able to explain low level clojure to average dev. to help them understand how clojure benefits them which is happening but at a scarce rate which sometimes gives me concern about clojure.

 

you've contributed to number 3. with a great book that I've purchased

 

 

my planned domain for clojure is:

 

Interactive audio (programming) overtone

graphics programming quil

web development clojurescript etc....

 

but can't get my head around the benefits of clojurescript.

Clojure is awesome and Rich Hickey is a genius :) I wish there were more jobs where I could develop using Clojure!

I use Clojure mostly as a DSL for generating html in large java systems - it works great. Currently in my free time experimenting with using Clojure as the only language for webdev and i'm more and more fascinated. For me, Clojure is the most exciting language i've seen for many years and i'm definitely willing to use it as my primary language. Thanks for this survey and keep up the good work!

I am utterly in love with Clojure. After having spent close to 7-8 years working with objects, I must admit that Clojure's philosophy came as a revelation to me! I have now completely moved away from OOP and I don't miss it at all...I will definitely look for a Clojure job as soon as I finish my PhD...hopefully there will be plenty by then (fingers crossed!)

I love Clojure and the docs + books are now very good, I'd like to see a similar situation for Clojurescript.

I think that the community is in desperate need of a definitive clojurescript book. Clojurescript has huge potential but needs a authoritative book outlining best practices and examples to rally the community to it. Its very hard to get started and find examples.

GREAT language, GREAT environment, GREAT community.

That's a very enjoyable language to program with. And it makes me feel like a wizard :)

I love Clojure and have learnt a great deal from using it. My one concern about using it production is finding enough people who are also believers. As it's quite a different way of thinking, it could leave us in a tricky spot in the near/medium future... hopefully it will continue to grow! I'll certainly continue to use it and preach to others!

Love the language, love the community, really appreciate all folks are doing to bring Clojure to us.

Love Clojure.

In a way, Clojure has contributed to my isolation, as I must now reach out to find camaraderie outside of Java the Language.  I haven't executed this profound a change in my crowd since I became a parent.  I find I must temper my evangelizing out of kindness and tolerance for one cannot impose epiphany.

Keep going on! Your doing a great job.

Keep going on! Your doing a great job.

BTW, is it possible to convince Maven Central Repository to list Leiningen version string as they do for Buildr, Ivy, Grape, and Scala SBT?

Clojure's a great project. I'm glad to see it used as much as it is on Github.  In a lot of cases where people mention Scala, I like to bring up Clojure as a simpler language to work with.  It's smaller, has less confusing syntaxes (due to not having too many operators or supporting operator overloading) and just pleasant to work with in general.  Leiningen makes working with clojure very nice, and the Emacs plugins are handy too.

Great that this survey is done every year. Interesting to see trends :)

 

Great work!

It's awesome!

I stopped experimenting with Clojure, because Scala appears to be easier to pitch to corporate IT.  Thus, (for now) I've been working on pitching functional programming via Scala to our IT department.

 

Although, Clojure is elogant, the LISP syntax to too great a leap for most Java developers. However, I plan to pursue Clojure in the future, since I am very fond of Clojure.

Clojure and its library ecosystem are not very self-documenting.

 

JVM limitations (particularly adding/reloading external jars) are a source of friction.

 

Error messages are, on the whole, depressingly ugly and unhelpful.

Thank you Clojure for bringing fun back to programming.

Clojure is great, but it seems to be an for geniuses by geniuses. I hope it will be a successful niche language for decades to come!

Love clojure, the community, and this survey.

Stopped using Clojure (before Seesaw) because of the difficulty of integrating Java Swing library.

Clojure is great. And the community is one of the nicest too.

Clojure is great! Thanks!

Thank you for the great work!

I wish the Clojure community would stop treating Clojure like a hobby and throw down the gauntlet with respect to developing web apps like the Rails community. Too much of the old Lisp culture is slipping into the community and there's a lot of talking and not much doing. I live in NYC and see Rich Hickey and all those guys at the Clojure meet-ups looking down from the ivory tower whereas I can go to a Rails meetup and see people developing real apps and getting real projects done.

Clojure is the first language I've used in a long time which has really blown me away, and it's the first language where all necessary compromises have been in perfect accordance with my own opinions. It really has ruined me for any other language!

When you need static typing - chose Haskell.

When you need dynamic typing - chose Clojure.

 

Community is friendly and helpful. Rich Hickey, Stuart Halloway and the rest of clojure/core have set a good tone for the community. Even 'difficult' people on the ML are treated well. You guys should be proud.

Having a great deal of fun!

Thanks for doing the survey